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Camouflage smock – Heer -Splittertarn – Hoodless

Type of uniform: Hoodless Heer Tarnjacke or camouflage smock in Splittertarn camouflage.
Material: Splittertarn camouflageprinted on Drillich.
Colour: Splittertarn camouflage on one side and the inside the natural Drillich colour. This was reversible to camouflage in winter however period images of this are very scarce.
Branch: Heer
Markings: K.M.F. Landeshut
Maker: K.M.F. Landeshut
Size: 2
Notes:

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M42 Camouflage smock – Waffen-SS – Plane tree 5/6

Type of uniform: Waffen-SS M42 camouflage smock or Tarnjacke in Plane tree 5/6 or Platanenmuster camouflage
Material: Reversible Plane tree 5/6 or Platanenmuster camouflage printed on so called Makostoff. 
Colour: Plane tree 5/6 or Platanenmuster camouflage, one side with brown tints and the other with greens. This was reversible to camouflage in all seasons.
Branch: Waffen-SS
Notes: Waffen-SS M42 Camouflage Smock (Tarnjacke). This is a M42 type 1 smock with horizontal lower pockets. The smock is made out of hand screened Plane Tree 5/6 or Platanenmuster pattern camouflage.  The reversible pockets are constructed in standard fieldgrey HBT or Drillich. The fooliage loops and the collar bordering are made of a different camouflage print.

fjm44 collection

 

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M42 Camouflage smock – Waffen-SS – blurred edge

Type of uniform: Waffen-SS M42 Tarnjacke or camouflage smock in blurred edge or Rauchtarnmuster camouflage
Material: Reversible Rauchtarnmuster or blurred edge camouflage printed on so called Makostoff.
Colour: blurred edge or Rauchtarnmuster camouflage, one side with brown tints and the other with greens. This was reversible to camouflage in all seasons.
Branch: Waffen-SS
Notes: Waffen-SS M42 Camouflage Smock (Tarnjacke). This is an M42 type 1 smock having the horizontal lower pockets.

A Belgian collection

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HBT or Drillich M42 Camouflage smock – Waffen-SS – Oak “A”

Type of uniform: Waffen-SS M42 Tarnjacke or camouflage smock in Eichenlaubmuster A or Oak “A” camouflage.
Material: Reversible Eichenlaubmuster A or Oak “A” camouflage printed on so called Drillich or HBT material.
Colour: Eichenlaubmuster A or Oak “A” camouflage, one side with brown tints and the other with greens. This was reversible to camouflage in all seasons.
Branch: Waffen-SS
Notes: Waffen-SS M42 Camouflage Smock (Tarnjacke). This is an M42 type 2 smock having the slashed lower pockets. One of the latest smocks!

A Belgian Collection

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MP40 pouch – jsd 1942

The magazine pouch designed for the MP40 or Magazintasche MP38 u. 40 was first implemented in 1938 when the MP38 was introduced as the new weapon for squad leaders or Gruppenführer. The pouches came in sets of two and each pouch had 3 individual cells for single 32 round magazines. One left and one right pouch. The left pouch had a extra compartment where a speed loader was kept. A wide variety of different materials, colours and designs where produced throughout the war. Leather, rayon, canvas where the main components used in the manufacture of the pouches.

Model: Magazintasche MP.38 U. 40
Markings:
 MP.38 U. 40 – jsd 1942 – WaA 927
Maker: jsd indicates production by Gustav Reinhardt, Lederwarenfabrik, Berlin
Colour of main material: Green canvas
Closing straps: Brown leather
Belt loops: Brown leather
D-ring strap: Grey canvas
Notes: 

Lowlands collection – Do you have the other side to match this pouch? Feel free to contact me!

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MP40 pouch – clg 42

The magazine pouch designed for the MP40 or Magazintasche MP38 u. 40 was first implemented in 1938 when the MP38 was introduced as the new weapon for squad leaders or Gruppenführer. The pouches came in sets of two and each pouch had 3 individual cells for single 32 round magazines. One left and one right pouch. The left pouch had a extra compartment where a speed loader was kept. A wide variety of different materials, colours and designs where produced throughout the war. Leather, rayon, canvas where the main components used in the manufacture of the pouches.

Model: Magazintasche MP.38 U. 40
Markings:
 MP.38 U. 40 – clg 42 – WaA 136
Maker: clg  indicates production by Ernst Melzig Lederwaren, Liegnitz
Colour of main material: Blue canvas
Closing straps: Black leather
Belt loops: Black leather
D-ring strap: Black leather
Notes: –

Lowlands collection

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MP40 pouch – dkk 42

The magazine pouch designed for the MP40 or Magazintasche MP38 u. 40 was first implemented in 1938 when the MP38 was introduced as the new weapon for squad leaders or Gruppenführer. The pouches came in sets of two and each pouch had 3 individual cells for single 32 round magazines. One left and one right pouch. The left pouch had a extra compartment where a speed loader was kept. A wide variety of different materials, colours and designs where produced throughout the war. Leather, rayon, canvas where the main components used in the manufacture of the pouches.

Model: Magazintasche MP.38 U. 40
Markings:
 MP.38 U. 40 – dkk 42 – WaA 136
Maker: dkk  indicates production by Friedrich Offermann u. Söhne, Lederwarenfabrik, Bensberg
Colour of main material: Green canvas
Closing straps: Brown leather with square metal tips
Belt loops: Brown leather
D-ring strap: Brown leather
Notes: This pouch features the textbook DKK mismatch, the closing flaps being from a different material then the base material.

Lowlands collection – Do you have the other side match to this pouch? Feel free to contact me!

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MP40 pouch – dkk 41

The magazine pouch designed for the MP40 or Magazintasche MP38 u. 40 was first implemented in 1938 when the MP38 was introduced as the new weapon for squad leaders or Gruppenführer. The pouches came in sets of two and each pouch had 3 individual cells for single 32 round magazines. One left and one right pouch. The left pouch had a extra compartment where a speed loader was kept. A wide variety of different materials, colours and designs where produced throughout the war. Leather, rayon, canvas where the main components used in the manufacture of the pouches.

Model: Magazintasche MP.38 U. 40
Markings:
 MP.38 U. 40 – dkk 41 or 42 – WaA 136
Maker: dkk  indicates production by Friedrich Offermann u. Söhne, Lederwarenfabrik, Bensberg
Colour of main material: Green canvas
Closing straps: Brown leather with square metal tips
Belt loops: Brown leather
D-ring strap: Brown leather
Notes: –

Lowlands collection – Do you have the other side match to this pouch? Feel free to contact me!

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MP40 pouch – hjg 1943

The magazine pouch designed for the MP40 or Magazintasche MP38 u. 40 was first implemented in 1938 when the MP38 was introduced as the new weapon for squad leaders or Gruppenführer. The pouches came in sets of two and each pouch had 3 individual cells for single 32 round magazines. One left and one right pouch. The left pouch had a extra compartment where a speed loader was kept. A wide variety of different materials, colours and designs where produced throughout the war. Leather, rayon, canvas where the main components used in the manufacture of the pouches.

Model: Magazintasche MP.38 U. 40
Markings:
 MP.38 U. 40 – hjg 1943 – WaA 136
Maker: hjg indicates production by Kimnach u. Brunn, Fabrik fuer Heeresausruestung, Kaiserslautern
Colour of main material: Tan canvas
Closing straps: Brown leather
Belt loops: Brown leather
D-ring strap: Brown leather
Notes: –

Lowlands collection – Do you have the other side match to this pouch? Feel free to contact me!

 

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MP40 pouch – gmn 1942

The magazine pouch designed for the MP40 or Magazintasche MP38 u. 40 was first implemented in 1938 when the MP38 was introduced as the new weapon for squad leaders or Gruppenführer. The pouches came in sets of two and each pouch had 3 individual cells for single 32 round magazines. One left and one right pouch. The left pouch had a extra compartment where a speed loader was kept. A wide variety of different materials, colours and designs where produced throughout the war. Leather, rayon, canvas where the main components used in the manufacture of the pouches.

Markings: MP.38 U. 40 – gmn 1942 – WaA 136
Maker: Phillipp Riebel & Söhne, Sattlerwaren- u.Sportartikelfabrik
Colour of main material: Green canvas
Closing straps: Brown leather
Belt loops: Brown leather
D-ring strap: Brown leather
Notes: –

Lowlands collection

 

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Jackboots – 0/0762/0023

Together with the helmet, the jackboots or Marschstiefel where amongst the most iconic parts of the German uniform. The tall (mostly) polished boots mirrored the political and military ideology of the Nazi regime being strong, tough and able to trample. The hobnailed jackboots where a good strong choice which could be comfortably worn on long marches.
The prewar jackboots where around 39 cm tall and since 1939 produced 4cm shorter due to material scarcity.

Eversince 1937, Soldiers in the German army received a pair of Schnürschuhe (lowboots) next to their issue pair of Marschstiefel(Jackboots). They where first only meant as a part of the Drillichanzug(a offwhite uniform for basic training made of linen HBT) but as the war progressed the Schnürschuhe saw action on the front. They where meant to be worn with Gamaschen(Gaiters) to overlap the boots with the trousers.

The sole consists of 3 major components; the heel, the base sole and the front half sole. The heel is constructed of a series of stacked leather pieces and has a steel heel iron. The base sole is slightly curved and stretches from front to back. It is both stitched and nailed with wooden pegs. The Stitches normally run in a “hidden stitch” left and right of the wooden pegs. The front half sole was affixed with wooden pegs and carries a number of steel hobnails. Though most boots come out of the factory untanned, the sides of the soles where always blackened. The soldiers where ordered to blacken the boots until it was discontinued in 1943.

Maker: 0/0762/0023
Length size: 28 1/2
Width size: 4
Year: 1944
Material: Blackened leather
Notes: This is the wartime variant, 35 cm tall. 

 

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MP40 pouches – clg 43

The magazine pouch designed for the MP40 or Magazintasche MP38 u. 40 was first implemented in 1938 when the MP38 was introduced as the new weapon for squad leaders or Gruppenführer. The pouches came in sets of two and each pouch had 3 individual cells for single 32 round magazines. One left and one right pouch. The left pouch had a extra compartment where a speed loader was kept. A wide variety of different materials, colours and designs where produced throughout the war. Leather, rayon, canvas where the main components used in the manufacture of the pouches.

Markings: MP38 u. 40 – clg43 – WaA 86?
Maker: Ernst Melzig Lederwaren, Liegnitz
Colour of main material: Green canvas
Closing straps: Blackened leather
Belt loops: Blackened leather
D-ring strap: Blackened leather
Notes:

 

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K98 bandoleer – Tan – 0/0510/0052 1944

The ammunition pouch for the K98 (Karabiner 98) bolt action rifle was executed in leather. Each soldier had two pouches which held 30 rounds each. The pouches where divided in 3 main compartments with a divider in each. The 7,92 x 57 mm ammunition was loaded on 5 round clips. Pre/early war the pouches where executed in brown leather, to be blackened and polished by the individual soldier. Some time early in the war (most) producers switched to blackening the leather pre production. Further simplifications occurred in 1943 when the pouches where further simplified. Some of these changes are the shortened loops for the belt and the use of rivets in stead of stitching or even combined. The back of the pouches have a D-ring to which the front hooks of the Y-strap would be attached.

Next to these leather K98 pouches a specialized bandoleer was developed for the German paratroopers or Fallschirmjäger. These bandoleers carried 20 5-round stripper clips totaling 100 rounds. Each clip had its own compartment secured with a small press stud. The Fallschirmjäger bandoleer saw a few developments through the war such as change of materials and design.

Model:Tan bandoleer for paratroopers or Fallschirmjäger
Presstuds per flap: 1
Presstud marking: Unmarked
Pattern or colour:
 Tan Luftwaffe fabric
Marking: 0/0510/0052 1944
Maker:
It is unclear to what specific manufacturer 0/0510/0052 refers to
Year: 1944

Lowlands Collection

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K98 Bayonet – 43 cof

Ever since the introduction of the K98 bolt action rifle or Karabiner 98 Kurz as a replacement for the G98 or Gewehr 98 a new, shorter bayonet was designed. The K98 bayonet was officially named Seitengewehr 84/98 or SG 84/98.  The bayonet was designed as a close combat sidearm that could be placed on the tip of a K98.

The total length of the K98 bayonet was 38,7 cm in contrary to the 50.2 cm long G98 bayonet. The blade was also more straight and the hand guard was omitted. The K98 bayonet was carried in a leather frog or Seitengewehrtragetasche.  It was carried in the frog on the left side on the equipment belt in combination with the shovel and its carrier. The maker marks on k98 bayonets where stamped onto the top of the blade. On the reverse the batch number and suffix where stamped.

Model bayonet: Seitengewehr 84/98
Markings: cof 43
Maker: Waffenfabrik Carl Eickhorn, Solingen
Year: 1943
Material: Blued steel
Grip material: Wood
Notes:
 –

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Steel belt buckle – Luftwaffe – Hermann Aurich 1940

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS  belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Branch:
 Luftwaffe
Motto: 
Markings: Hermann Aurich, Dresden 1940
Maker: Hermann Aurich, Dresden 
Year: 1940
Material: Stamped steel
Paint: Dark blue (Graublau)
Notes:

 

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Steel belt buckle – Heer – H. Arld 1941

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS  belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Branch: Wehrmacht (Heer)
Motto: Gott Mit Uns
Markings: H. Arld Nuernberg 1941
Maker: H. Arld, Nuernberg.
Year: 1941
Material: Painted steel with a leather tab.
Paint: Green paint
Notes:

 

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Aluminium belt buckle – Waffen-SS – RZM 822/37 ᛋᛋ

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS  belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Branch: Waffen-SS
Motto: Meine Ehre heißt Treue
Markings: RZM 822/37 ᛋᛋ
Maker: 822 is presumed to be Richard Sieper or C.T. Dicke. 
Year: 1937
Material: Aluminium
Paint: Silver
Notes: This near mint buckle is in unissued condition, the silver paint that usually is missing still retains for 99%.

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Grossdeutschland grouping with Cufftitle and medals to Herbert Rihm

Herbert Rihm was born 1st of November 1924 in Mannheim. He had a evangelical upbringing and attended evening school. He received the medical examination on the 23rd of Febuary 1942 and was deemed fit for military service on the 30th of May 1942. He received training with the 98K and MG34. The 5th of Febuary 1943 he enlisted in the Stammkompanie Grenadier Ersatz Battalion 107. The 1st of March 1943 he transferred to 6. (M.G.) Ausb. Kemp. Gren. Ers. Regt. (mot) Grossdeutschland. The 26th of July 1943 he transferred to II. Gren. Ers. Rgt. (mot) Grossdeutschland. The 13th of August 1943 he transferred to 9.(M.G.) Füs. Rgt. Grossdeutschland and finally on the 15th of December 1943 to II. Gen. Kp. Pz. Gren. Ers. Rgt. G.D.
He received both the black and silver Verwundetenabzeichen, the close combat clasp or Nahkampfspange, Ostmedaille, Infanterie Sturmabzeichen in Bronze, Eisernes Kreuz II klasse and last but not least the 4th pattern Grossdeutschland cuff title.

He was wounded on the 14th of December 1943 and afterwards send back home to recover. He never re-enlisted and survived the war. The grouping, as shown was sold by the veteran to a collector on a Veterantreffen in Germany. The grouping consists of all shown attributes and would be very hard to upgrade.

 

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K98 bayonet – J. Sch. 1939 – Bakelite grips

Ever since the introduction of the K98 bolt action rifle or Karabiner 98 Kurz as a replacement for the G98 or Gewehr 98 a new, shorter bayonet was designed. The K98 bayonet was officially named Seitengewehr 84/98 or SG 84/98.  The bayonet was designed as a close combat sidearm that could be placed on the tip of a K98.

The total length of the K98 bayonet was 38,7 cm in contrary to the 50.2 cm long G98 bayonet. The blade was also more straight and the hand guard was omitted. The K98 bayonet was carried in a leather frog or Seitengewehrtragetasche.  It was carried in the frog on the left side on the equipment belt in combination with the shovel and its carrier. The maker marks on k98 bayonets where stamped onto the top of the blade. On the reverse the batch number and suffix where stamped.

Model bayonet: Seitengewehr 84/98
Markings: J. Sch. 1939
Maker: Jetter und Scheerer
Year: 1939
Material: Blued steel
Grip material: Bakelite
Notes:
Jetter und Scheerer bayonets are a relatively rare manufacturer

J. Sch. – Jetter und Scheerer

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K98 bayonet – 44 cvl – wooden grips

Ever since the introduction of the K98 bolt action rifle or Karabiner 98 Kurz as a replacement for the G98 or Gewehr 98 a new, shorter bayonet was designed. The K98 bayonet was officially named Seitengewehr 84/98 or SG 84/98.  The bayonet was designed as a close combat sidearm that could be placed on the tip of a K98.

The total length of the K98 bayonet was 38,7 cm in contrary to the 50.2 cm long G98 bayonet. The blade was also more straight and the hand guard was omitted. The K98 bayonet was carried in a leather frog or Seitengewehrtragetasche.  It was carried in the frog on the left side on the equipment belt in combination with the shovel and its carrier. The maker marks on k98 bayonets where stamped onto the top of the blade. On the reverse the batch number and suffix where stamped.

Model bayonet: Seitengewehr 84/98
Markings: 44 cvl – 9051
Maker: WKC Waffenfabrik G.m.b.H., Solingen-Wald.
Year: 1944
Material: Blued steel
Grip material: Wood
Notes:
 –

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K98 bayonet – Jos Corts 1939 – Bakelite grips

Ever since the introduction of the K98 bolt action rifle or Karabiner 98 Kurz as a replacement for the G98 or Gewehr 98 a new, shorter bayonet was designed. The K98 bayonet was officially named Seitengewehr 84/98 or SG 84/98.  The bayonet was designed as a close combat sidearm that could be placed on the tip of a K98.

The total length of the K98 bayonet was 38,7 cm in contrary to the 50.2 cm long G98 bayonet. The blade was also more straight and the hand guard was omitted. The K98 bayonet was carried in a leather frog or Seitengewehrtragetasche.  It was carried in the frog on the left side on the equipment belt in combination with the shovel and its carrier. The maker marks on k98 bayonets where stamped onto the top of the blade. On the reverse the batch number and suffix where stamped.

Model bayonet: Seitengewehr 84/98
Markings: Jos. Corts Sn 1939
Maker: Josua Corts Sohn, Remscheid
Year: 1939
Material: Blued steel
Grip material: Bakelite
Notes:
 Jos. Corts bayonets are a relatively rare manufacturer

 

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M31 Messkit – OHW 44

The M31 messkit or “Kochgeschirre M 31 (Alum.)” was a 1.6 liter capacity cooking pot carried on the left side of the breadbag. The messkit was a clever engineered piece of equipment capable of serving as a cooking or eating pot. The early models also had indicating marks on the front, under the handle on which could measure the size of the contents. It had a cleverly placed wire handle on which the messkit could be hung above a fire. The messkits came in a big variety of colours and materials. At first the messkits where nearly completely made out of aluminium except the wire handle. From around 1940 onwards the handle on the lid was made from steel. In 1942 the simplified steel model “Kochgeschirre M 42 (Eis.)” was introduced. It had less and less well crafted details and the production became a hurry. I found the designation “M42” in the production numbers of the German Industry.

Model: M31
Marking: OHW 44
Maker: Otto Honsel-Werke, Aluminiumwerk, Werdohl
Material: Painted aluminium
Colour: Olive
Notes: –

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Equipment belt – Tropical – Jobra 1943

The standard Equipment belt or Koppelriemen kept all the equipment together and is to be considered one of the key elements. Finding a nice one can be hard nowadays and reproductions are plenty. Right up to 1943 the early model was produced with a leather tongue with a series of holes on the inside which kept the prongs of the belt buckle. The later models where simplified whereas this leather tongue was omitted and the holes simply cut through the belt. The hook for the belt buckle was first produced in aluminium later to be replaced by steel. The belts are adjustable and marked in size ranging between 75 and 120 centimeters. These belts also came in a tropical variant made from webbing material. These are always made in the configuration with a leather tongue.

Colour: Tan
Material: Webbing with leather tongue
Markings: Jobra 1943
Maker: Jobra
Year: 1943
Hardware: Steel hook
Size: 90 centimeters
Notes: 

 

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K98 bandoleer – Blue – Unmarked

The ammunition pouch for the K98 (Karabiner 98) bolt action rifle was executed in leather. Each soldier had two pouches which held 30 rounds each. The pouches where divided in 3 main compartments with a divider in each. The 7,92 x 57 mm ammunition was loaded on 5 round clips. Pre/early war the pouches where executed in brown leather, to be blackened and polished by the individual soldier. Some time early in the war (most) producers switched to blackening the leather pre production. Further simplifications occurred in 1943 when the pouches where further simplified. Some of these changes are the shortened loops for the belt and the use of rivets in stead of stitching or even combined. The back of the pouches have a D-ring to which the front hooks of the Y-strap would be attached.

Next to these leather K98 pouches a specialized bandoleer was developed for the German paratroopers or Fallschirmjäger. These bandoleers carried 20 5-round stripper clips totaling 100 rounds. Each clip had its own compartment secured with a small press stud. The Fallschirmjäger bandoleer saw a few developments through the war such as change of materials and design.

Model: Blue bandoleer for paratroopers or Fallschirmjäger
Presstuds per flap: 1
Presstud marking: Unmarked
Pattern or colour:
 Blue Luftwaffe fabric
Marking: unmarked
Maker:

Year: –

Julien Collection

 

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A-frame pouch – Jean Weipert Offenbach am Main 1940

The A-frame or Gefechtsgepäck für Infanterie Schützenkompanien was a small canvas frame which was carried on the Y-strap. It was introduced in 1939. The A-frame was a way for soldiers to pack away their secondary necessities and to divide the weight more evenly on the equipment.

The A-frame carries the following items:

Messkit or M31 Kochgeschirr
Quarter shelter or M31 Zeltbahn
A-frame bag or Beutel zum Gefechtsgepäck

The A-frame bag or Beutel zum Gefechtsgepäck was used to carry a sweater, rifle cleaning kit and the Eiserne Portion.

The A-frame was made in a few varieties showing various ways of manufacture. Later in the war the bags where also made from recycled equipment.

Model: A-frame pouch
Markings: Jean Weipert Offenbach am Main 1940
Year: 1940
Maker: Jean Weipert Offenbach am Main
Material: Green canvas with blackened leather

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M40 Shoulderboards – NCO – Unteroffizier – Heer Panzerjäger

The German army uniform where standard per army and most had removable shoulder boards. These shoulder boards or Schulterklappen where sewn from wool with a coloured piping on the side to designate the specific branch the soldier was serving in. At first shoulder boards where still manufactured with wool piping but around 1941 they switched to rayon piping. Further in the war these shoulder boards became more simplified and less well made. A lot of different shoulder boards where worn in the German army between 1933 and 1945 and they came with different sizes, colours, piping and ranks.

Model: M40
Piping: Rayon piping, pink for Panzerjäger
Branch: Pink for Panzerjäger
Unit: Unspecified
Rank: A non commissioned officer or NCO by the rank of Unteroffizier in a Panzerjäger unit
Wool: Grey wool
Timeframe: 1940-1943
Notes:

 

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Aluminium buckle – Heer – R. Sieper & Sohne 1938

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS  belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Next to the German armed forces most paramilitary organizations had their own belt buckle too. I will mostly focus on the German military issue belt buckles but I will photograph private purchase parade buckles when I have the chance.

Branch: Wehrmacht (Heer)
Motto: Gott Mit Uns
Markings: R. Sieper & Sohne 1938 on the tab and RS&S on the buckle
Maker: Richard Sieper & Sohne 
Year: 1938
Material: Molded and shaped aluminium
Paint: Green paint
Notes: 

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Steel belt buckle – Heer – B. Haarmann 1941

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS  belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Branch: Wehrmacht (Heer)
Motto: Gott Mit Uns
Markings: B. Haarmann Lüdenscheid 1941
Maker: B. Haarmann Lüdenscheid 
Year: 1941
Material: Painted steel with a leather tab.
Paint: Apple green paint
Notes:

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Steel belt buckle – Heer – B&N-43

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS  belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Next to the German armed forces most paramilitary organizations had their own belt buckle too. I will mostly focus on the German military issue belt buckles but I will photograph private purchase parade buckles when I have the chance.

Branch: Wehrmacht (Heer)
Motto: Gott Mit Uns
Markings: B&N-43
Maker: Berg & Nolte Akt.-Ges., Lüdenscheid
Year: 1943
Material: Stamped steel
Paint: Dark blue (Graublau)
Notes: –

 

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Steel belt buckle – Heer – Unmarked Assmann

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Branch: Wehrmacht (Heer)
Motto: Gott Mit Uns
Markings: unmarked
Maker: Assmann & Söhne, Lüdenscheid 
Year: 1943-1945
Material: Painted steel
Paint: Green
Notes: This buckle is unmarked but can be maker identified by the bent prongs which is a typical attribute for Assmann & Söhne Lüdenscheid.

 

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Steel belt buckle – Heer – Unmarked Brüder Schneider

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Branch: Wehrmacht (Heer)
Motto: Gott Mit Uns
Markings: unmarked
Maker: Brüder Schneider, Wien.
Year: 1943-1945
Material: Painted steel
Paint: Dark blue (Graublau)
Notes: This buckle is unmarked and roughly made in comparison to earlier versions of this maker.

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MP40 pouch – first model – bnz 1941

The magazine pouch designed for the MP40 or Magazintasche MP38 u. 40 was first implemented in 1938 when the MP38 was introduced as the new weapon for squad leaders or Gruppenführer. The pouches came in sets of two and each pouch had 3 individual cells for single 32 round magazines. One left and one right pouch. The left pouch had a extra compartment where a speed loader was kept. A wide variety of different materials, colours and designs where produced throughout the war. Leather, rayon, canvas where the main components used in the manufacture of the pouches.

Markings: bnz 1941
Maker: bnz indicates production by Steyr-Daimler-Puch AG, Steyr
Colour of main material: Blue grey canvas
Closing straps: Rayon with metal tips
Belt loops: Rayon
D-ring strap: rayon
Notes: This is the first type MP38 u. MP40 pouch which can seen a lot at the invasion in Crete

Julien Collection

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Police P08 holster – Hardshell – Schambach & Co Berlin 1942

During the war the Germans produced, captured and reissued many different pistols to their troops. Most if not all pistols had specific holsters and some pistols even had multiple kinds of holsters. Captured pistols where sometimes even fitted with new, German made holsters during the war. The standard pistol in the German army was the P.08 which in 1938 was replaced by the P.38. The P.08 was replaced but remained in production until 1945 by Krieghoff.

The Walther Pistole 38 (P.38) pistol was first introduced in 1938 as a replacement for the P.08. The P.38 was a more cost-efficient and more reliable in  war conditions such as mud and rain. The P.08 was a typical prewar German gun, over engineered to perfection with a sensitive toggle breech system that would malfunction when dirt was involved. The P.38 was a workhorse that did just what it was meant to do. It could handle most harsh battlefield conditions and as such the closed hardshell holster was discontinued later in the war and replaced for a open softshell holster. During the war 990.080 P.38 pistols where produced by Walther, Mauser and Spreewerk.

Pistol: Luger Pistole 08 (P.08)
Model holster: Police hardshell Luger holster
Markings: Schambach & Co Berlin 1942 – Police eagle
Maker: Schambach & Co Berlin
Year: 1942
Material: Brown leather
Notes:

 

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P38 holster – Hardshell – Cristof Neuner Lederfabrik 1943

During the war the Germans produced, captured and reissued many different pistols to their troops. Most if not all pistols had specific holsters and some pistols even had multiple kinds of holsters. Captured pistols where sometimes even fitted with new, German made holsters during the war. The standard pistol in the German army was the P.08 which in 1938 was replaced by the P.38. The P.08 was replaced but remained in production until 1945 by Krieghoff.

The Walther Pistole 38 (P.38) pistol was first introduced in 1938 as a replacement for the P.08. The P.38 was a more cost-efficient and more reliable in  war conditions such as mud and rain. The P.08 was a typical prewar German gun, over engineered to perfection with a sensitive toggle breech system that would malfunction when dirt was involved. The P.38 was a workhorse that did just what it was meant to do. It could handle most harsh battlefield conditions and as such the closed hardshell holster was discontinued later in the war and replaced for a open softshell holster. During the war 990.080 P.38 pistols where produced by Walther, Mauser and Spreewerk.

Pistol: Walther Pistole 38 (P.38)
Model holster: Hardshell
Markings: Oak leaf logo 1943
Year: 1943
Maker: the Oak leaf logo indicates production by Cristof Neuner Lederfabrik
Material: Dyed leather
Notes: –

 

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M37 lowboots – 0/0744/5061

Eversince 1937, Soldiers in the German army received a pair of Schnürschuhe (lowboots) next to their issue pair of Knobelbecher(Jackboots). They where first only meant as a part of the Drillichanzug(a offwhite uniform for basic training made of linen HBT) but as the war progressed the Schnürschuhe saw action on the front. They where meant to be worn with Gamaschen(Gaiters) to overlap the boots with the trousers.

The Schnurschuhe are always made following a certain army design. they close with a set of 5 eyelets and 4 speed lace hooks. Later in the war the 4 speed lace hooks where omitted and replaced by 4 eyelets. The sole consists of 3 major components; the heel, the base sole and the front half sole. The heel is constructed of a series of stacked leather pieces and has a steel heel iron. The base sole is slightly curved and stretches from front to back. It is both stitched and nailed with wooden pegs. The Stitches normally run in a “hidden stitch” left and right of the wooden pegs. The front half sole was affixed with wooden pegs and carries a number of steel hobnails. Though most boots come out of the factory untanned, the sides of the soles where always blackened. The soldiers where ordered to blacken the boots until it was discontinued in 1943.

This is the textbook German m37 lowboot. There are off course variations, especially later in the war.

Sole length: 30
Sole width:
5
Lot number:
7002
Markings: 0/0744/5061
Maker:
It is unclear to what manufacturer 0/0744/5061 refers to, but 0744 indicates the company was based in Baden.
Month: May
Year: 1943
Material: Blackened leather
Notes:

 

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Straight E-tool – R. Dahlmann Sohn 1935

The straight handled shovel or Kleines Schanzzeug was the primary entrenching tool within the German army. It was first introduced in the German army before the first world war after a Danish design by Mads Linnemann. The Germans used several types of straight handled shovels during the war. The most commonly seen type of straight handled shovel used by the Germans has a spot welded blade that has been folded at the top. Next to the use as a tool for digging, it could be used to hack wood and to some extent as a close combat weapon.

The cover was initially fully made out of leather. It consists of 2 carrying loops and a strap to tie down the handle. In the design of the strap a certain amount of extra length was accounted for so a bayonet could be tied to the handle of the E-tool. In 1943 the main material was changed from leather to Ersatzmaterial(artificial leather) completely. The covers came in a few variations in material, colour, construction, buckle and leather colour.

Markings: R. Dahlmann Sohn 1935
Maker: R. Dahlmann Sohn indicates production by R. Dahlmann u. Sohn, Gevelsberg I/W.
Material: Steel and wood
Notes: 

 

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straight E-tool cover – Lederwarenwerk Curt Vogel, Cottbus 1934

The straight handled shovel or Kleines Schanzzeug was the primary entrenching tool within the German army. It was first introduced in the German army before the first world war after a Danish design by Mads Linnemann. The Germans used several types of straight handled shovels during the war. The most commonly seen type of straight handled shovel used by the Germans has a spot welded blade that has been folded at the top. Next to the use as a tool for digging, it could be used to hack wood and to some extent as a close combat weapon.

The cover was initially fully made out of leather. It consists of 2 carrying loops and a strap to tie down the handle. In the design of the strap a certain amount of extra length was accounted for so a bayonet could be tied to the handle of the E-tool. In 1943 the main material was changed from leather to Ersatzmaterial(artificial leather) completely. The covers came in a few variations in material, colour, construction, buckle and leather colour.

Markings: Lederwarenwerk Curt Vogel, Cottbus 1934
Maker:Lederwarenwerk Curt Vogel, Cottbus
Year: 1934
Material: Blackened leather
Location of loops: Sewn inside
Buckle: Painted black
Notes:

 

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M31 Messkit – HWP 34

The M31 messkit or “Kochgeschirre M 31 (Alum.)” was a 1.6 liter capacity cooking pot carried on the left side of the breadbag. The messkit was a clever engineered piece of equipment capable of serving as a cooking or eating pot. The early models also had indicating marks on the front, under the handle on which could measure the size of the contents. It had a cleverly placed wire handle on which the messkit could be hung above a fire. The messkits came in a big variety of colours and materials. At first the messkits where nearly completely made out of aluminium except the wire handle. From around 1940 onwards the handle on the lid was made from steel. In 1942 the simplified steel model “Kochgeschirre M 42 (Eis.)” was introduced. It had less and less well crafted details and the production became a hurry. I found the designation “M42” in the production numbers of the German Industry.

Model: M31
Marking: HWP 34
Maker: HWP refers to the maker Hermann Wuppermann, Pinneberg
Material: Painted Aluminum
Year: 1934
Colour: black
Notes:

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M31 Messkit – FWBN 38

The M31 messkit or “Kochgeschirre M 31 (Alum.)” was a 1.6 liter capacity cooking pot carried on the left side of the breadbag. The messkit was a clever engineered piece of equipment capable of serving as a cooking or eating pot. The early models also had indicating marks on the front, under the handle on which could measure the size of the contents. It had a cleverly placed wire handle on which the messkit could be hung above a fire. The messkits came in a big variety of colours and materials. At first the messkits where nearly completely made out of aluminium except the wire handle. From around 1940 onwards the handle on the lid was made from steel. In 1942 the simplified steel model “Kochgeschirre M 42 (Eis.)” was introduced. It had less and less well crafted details and the production became a hurry. I found the designation “M42” in the production numbers of the German Industry.

Model: M31
Marking: FWBN 38
Maker: FWBN refers to the maker F.W. Brockelmann Aluminiumwerk GmbH KG, Neheim/Ruhr
Material: Painted Aluminum
Colour: Green
Notes:

 

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M42 Messkit – WJ43

The M31 messkit or “Kochgeschirre M 31 (Alum.)” was a 1.6 liter capacity cooking pot carried on the left side of the breadbag. The messkit was a clever engineered piece of equipment capable of serving as a cooking or eating pot. The early models also had indicating marks on the front, under the handle on which could measure the size of the contents. It had a cleverly placed wire handle on which the messkit could be hung above a fire. The messkits came in a big variety of colours and materials. At first the messkits where nearly completely made out of aluminium except the wire handle. From around 1940 onwards the handle on the lid was made from steel. In 1942 the simplified steel model “Kochgeschirre M 42 (Eis.)” was introduced. It had less and less well crafted details and the production became a hurry. I found the designation “M42” in the production numbers of the German Industry.

Model: M42 in brown paint
Marking: WJ43
Maker: –
Material: Steel painted in a red primer with the outside overpainted in brown.
Colour: This messkit was first primed in red, overpainted in brown externally.
Notes: This is the first time I’ve encountered one of these messkits in brown paint. The paint is the same colour as the late war AEMA canteen cups.

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M42 Canteen – Deutsche Emailwarenfabrik (DEF) – Schindler

Markings: none
Maker: Deutsche Emailwarenfabrik (DEF) – Oskar Schindler
Year: 1943
Strap: One piece construction black leather
Flask: Blue enameled steel, 0.8 liter
Cup: Blue enamel steel cup
Cover: Felt
Other notes: Messkits and canteens enameled in these colours are attributed to be made by the Deutsche Emailwarenfabrik (DEF) ran by Oskar Schindler. Messkits and canteens, unmarked, in these specific colours have been found in the old factory storage of the former DEF.  There are several other makers of enameled steel canteens and messkits but they all carry different characteristic features such as markings or specific colours. No other maker utilizes these light gray and blue colours and lacks markings. The light blue “wash” on top of the enamel is one of the typical features.

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M42 Canteen – AEMA 43

Markings: AEMA 44 on the strap
Maker: Annweiler Email-u.Metall-Werke, Annweil
Year: 1944
Strap: Two piece construction, brown leather, smooth side out.
Flask: Blue enameled steel, 0.8 liter
Cup: Brown enamel steel cup, unmarked without handles
Cover: Grey Gaberdine with three painted press studs
Other notes: This canteen has the late war cup finished in brown enamel without handles.

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Straight E-tool cover – bla 1944

The straight handled shovel or Kleines Schanzzeug was the primary entrenching tool within the German army. It was first introduced in the German army before the first world war after a Danish design by Mads Linnemann. The Germans used several types of straight handled shovels during the war. The most commonly seen type of straight handled shovel used by the Germans has a spot welded blade that has been folded at the top. Next to the use as a tool for digging, it could be used to hack wood and to some extent as a close combat weapon.

The cover was initially fully made out of leather. It consists of 2 carrying loops and a strap to tie down the handle. In the design of the strap a certain amount of extra length was accounted for so a bayonet could be tied to the handle of the E-tool. In 1943 the main material was changed from leather to Ersatzmaterial(artificial leather) completely. The covers came in a few variations in material, colour, construction, buckle and leather colour.

Markings: bla 1944
Maker: bla indicates production by E. G. Leuner, Bautzen
Year: 1941
Material: Ersatzmaterial, Pressed cardboard.
Location of loops: Sewn inside
Buckle: Painted grey, with roller.
Notes:

 

 

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Tan straight E-tool cover – bdt 44

The straight handled shovel or Kleines Schanzzeug was the primary entrenching tool within the German army. It was first introduced in the German army before the first world war after a Danish design by Mads Linnemann. The Germans used several types of straight handled shovels during the war. The most commonly seen type of straight handled shovel used by the Germans has a spot welded blade that has been folded at the top. Next to the use as a tool for digging, it could be used to hack wood and to some extent as a close combat weapon.

The cover was initially fully made out of leather. It consists of 2 carrying loops and a strap to tie down the handle. In the design of the strap a certain amount of extra length was accounted for so a bayonet could be tied to the handle of the E-tool. In 1943 the main material was changed from leather to Ersatzmaterial(artificial leather) completely. The covers came in a few variations in material, colour, construction, buckle and leather colour.

Markings: bdt 44 and 334 in red ink
Maker: bdt indicates production by Salewa, Lederwarenfabrik G.m.b.H., München.
Year: 1943
Material: Tan Ersatzmaterial, Pressed cardboard.
Location of loops: Sewn inside
Buckle: Painted grey
Notes:

 

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Helmet – M35 – ET66 – Three tone camouflage

Arguably the helmet was the most recognizable part of the individual German soldiers appearance. With a design that derived from the type used in world war one, the German helmet offered more protection then ones used by it’s enemies. The quality field gray painted steel helmet with two decals and rolled steel rim and leather liner was a labor intensive product and simplified as the war progressed. The earliest model helmet used in world war two was the model 35 or M35 Stahlhelm. During the war the helmet was simplified in 2 stages. In 1940 the airvents changed from separate rivets affixed to the helmet shell to stamped in the main body of the shell. In 1942 a new model was introduced where the rim of the shell was left sharp and not rolled over as previous models. These models are known in the collector community as M40 and M42. The low sides that protect the neck and ears, the tell tale design that the Germans introduced in 1935 can still be seen in modern day army helmets.

Model: M35 Heer (Presumably)
Decal: Heer (Presumably)
Paint:
1. Factory applied dull green gray paint with a factory applied Kriegsmarine decal and national tricolor decal. The national tricolor was removed as per regulations.
2. Two tone brush applied “Reissue” paint with another decal applied.
3. A green and tan overspray
Markings: ET66
Shell Maker: Eisenhüttenwerke, Thale.
Liner: First pattern Schuberth liner dated 1931. One of 2000 produced.
Size: Shellsize 66, headsize 58 cm
Notes: A uncommon early M35. The helmet has its original early liner dated 1931! The helmet has a 1935 dated chinstrap with a carabiner hook. Looking at the shell it looks different then most helmets I’ve seen. This is one of the earliest M35 helmets with a hand rolled rim. Like the period newsreel where the one guy hammers down the rim of the helmet. The helmet fully retains its original paint consisting of three separate layers; Apple green, Rautarn and three tone spray paint. Inside the helmet is named Uffz(Unteroffizier) Zim. Due to the rough overpaint of the helmet inside the helmet I can not make out any lot numbers or maker marks. The helmet is a 66 shell and a 58 liner. This helmet was retrieved out of the woodwork in the Netherlands. My favorite thing about this helmet is that it is super early, but kept in use until the end and is still around today!

 

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Helmet – M42 – hkp64 – Three tone “Normandy” camouflage

Arguably the helmet was the most recognizable part of the individual German soldiers appearance. With a design that derived from the type used in world war one, the German helmet offered more protection then ones used by it’s enemies. The quality field gray painted steel helmet with two decals and rolled steel rim and leather liner was a labor intensive product and simplified as the war progressed. The earliest model helmet used in world war two was the model 35 or M35 Stahlhelm. During the war the helmet was simplified in 2 stages. In 1940 the airvents changed from separate rivets affixed to the helmet shell to stamped in the main body of the shell. In 1942 a new model was introduced where the rim of the shell was left sharp and not rolled over as previous models. These models are known in the collector community as M40 and M42. The low sides that protect the neck and ears, the tell tale design that the Germans introduced in 1935 can still be seen in modern day army helmets.

Model: M40
Decal: Heer underneath the Normandy camouflage
Paint: Factory applied field grey paint with Normandy camouflage overpaint.
Markings: hkp64 2110
Maker: Sächsische Emaillier und Stanzwerke A.G.
Size: Shellsize 64, headsize 56 cm
Year: 1943-1944
Batch number: 2110
Notes: 

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Helmet – M42 – NS64 – Single decal Luftwaffe

Arguably the helmet was the most recognizable part of the individual German soldiers appearance. With a design that derived from the type used in world war one, the German helmet offered more protection then ones used by it’s enemies. The quality field gray painted steel helmet with two decals and rolled steel rim and leather liner was a labor intensive product and simplified as the war progressed. The earliest model helmet used in world war two was the model 35 or M35 Stahlhelm. During the war the helmet was simplified in 2 stages. In 1940 the airvents changed from separate rivets affixed to the helmet shell to stamped in the main body of the shell. In 1942 a new model was introduced where the rim of the shell was left sharp and not rolled over as previous models. These models are known in the collector community as M40 and M42. The low sides that protect the neck and ears, the tell tale design that the Germans introduced in 1935 can still be seen in modern day army helmets.

Model: M42 Luftwaffe
Decal: 
Luftwaffe
Paint: 
Factory applied textured Graublau paint with a Luftwaffe decal
Markings:
 NS64 D257
Maker: Vereinigte Deutsche Nikelwerke, Schwerte.
Size: Shellsize 64, headsize 56 cm
Batch number: D257
Year: 1944
Chinstrap: 
Notes: –

 

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Helmet – M38 Fallschirmjäger – ET68 single decal

Arguably the helmet was the most recognizable part of the individual German soldiers appearance. With a design that derived from the type used in world war one, the German helmet offered more protection then ones used by it’s enemies. The quality field gray painted steel helmet with two decals and rolled steel rim and leather liner was a labor intensive product and simplified as the war progressed. The earliest model helmet used in world war two was the model 35 or M35 Stahlhelm. During the war the helmet was simplified in 2 stages. In 1940 the airvents changed from separate rivets affixed to the helmet shell to stamped in the main body of the shell. In 1942 a new model was introduced where the rim of the shell was left sharp and not rolled over as previous models. These models are known in the collector community as M40 and M42. The low sides that protect the neck and ears, the tell tale design that the Germans introduced in 1935 can still be seen in modern day army helmets.

Model: Luftwaffe M38 (Fallschirmjäger)
Decal: Single Luftwaffe decal
Paint: Factory applied dull field Feldgrau or gray paint with rough aluminium oxide.
Markings: ET68 719
Maker: Eisen- u. Huettenwerke, Thale, Harz
Size: Shellsize 68, headsize 58 cm
Batch number: 719
Year: 1940
Notes: This is a early Fallschirmjäger helmet. Issued with a single Luftwaffe decal and finished in a rough field gray factory paint. This helmet is a typical early to mid war type with vented steel bolts. and has the early type dome padding in light grey colour. Probably one of the first helmets to be finished in Feldgrau  after the green helmets.

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Waffen-SS field uniform in Erbsentarn camouflage

A nice original combat worn Erbsentarn uniform. This set surfaced early 2018 when a old milk factory in Münster, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany was demolished. The garment was hidden inside a hollow wall and was has been there for over 70 years.

The garment consists of a field blouse and a pair of trousers intended to be worn over the woolen uniform. The blouse still retains its originally sewn BeVo sleeve eagle and its original glass tunic buttons. The buttons on the sleeves are of black bakelite. I can not find any markings in the tunic. The trousers are also in similar worn condition and has a large period repair in the back. The trousers are marked Betr. Ra. indicating production by Betrieb Ravensbrück or Gesellschaft für Textil- und Lederverwertung ( Texled ). The uniform is in good used condition and has holes here and there but still retains its nice camouflage colours. I have seen several “sets” but this is the only one that I’ve had that makes up a original worn together set.

 

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Field division smock – Luftwaffe Felddivision – Splittertarn B

Type of uniform: Luftwaffe field division combat smock or Tarnjacke in Splittertarn B or Splinter B camouflage material.
Material: Splittertarn B or Splinter B camouflage reverse printed on Drillich or hbt material.
Colour: Splittertarn B or Splinter B camouflage material.
Markings: 
Year: –
Notes: A nice Luftwaffe field division combat smock in Splittertarn B camouflage pattern. The Splittertarn B pattern has been printed on the back of Drillich or hbt material. This is so called reverse printed HBT and is something very common to the Waffen-SS Erbsentarn field blouses marked Betr. Ra. 

S H Collection

 


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Paratrooper smock – Knochensack – Splittertarn B – Rudolph Hubert & Cie

Type of uniform: Paratrooper jumpsmock or Fallschirmjäger Knochensack in Splittertarn B
Material: Splittertarn B
Colour: Splittertarn B
Markings: Rudolph Hubert & Cie 1.A B.42
Year: 1942
Maker: Rudolph Hubert & Cie
Zippers: Metal Elite zippers
Notes: The breast eagle is restored to this smock.

S. H. Collection

 

 

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Paratrooper smock – Knochensack – ’43 Sumpftarn – RBNR. 0/0708/0001 1945

Type of uniform: Paratrooper jumpsmock or Fallschirmjäger Knochensack in Sumpfmuster ’44 , Sumpftarn or marsh camouflage.
Material: Sumpfmuster ’43 , ‘hard edged’ Sumpftarn or marsh camouflage
Colour: Sumpfmuster ’43 , ‘hard edged’ Sumpftarn or marsh camouflage
Markings: RBNR. 0/0708/0001
Year: 1945
Maker: RBNR. 0/0708/0001 indicates production by Bekleidungsfabrik Habelt(Fritz) Crailsheim Baden-Württemberg 
Zippers: White plastic RiRi zippers
Notes: This Fallschirmjäger smock never worn and is in mint condition. The eagle mounted on the piece is a late war subdued eagle stitched on Drillich material.

S. H. Collection

 

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Camouflage smock – Heer – ’44 Sumpftarn – Hoodless

Type of uniform: Hoodless Heer Tarnjacke or camouflage smock in Sumpfmuster ’44 , Sumpftarn or marsh camouflage.
Material: Reversible Sumpfmuster ’44 , Sumpftarn or marsh camouflage printed on rayon.
Colour: Sumpfmuster ’44 , Sumpftarn or marsh camouflage on one side and the inside the natural rayon colour. This was reversible to camouflage in winter however period images of this are very scarce.
Branch: Heer
Markings: –
Maker: –
Notes: This smock is the first type produced after the hoodless smock in Splittertarnmuster. It further evolved with the addition of a hood later in the war.

German Relics collection

 

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M42 Canteen – SMM 45

Markings: SMM 45 on the flask and  SMM 44  on the cup
Maker: Süddeutsche Metallwarenfabrik, Mussbach
Year: 1945
Strap: Two piece construction, black leather, smooth side out.
Flask: Green painted steel
Cover:  Gaberdine with three painted press studs
Other notes: -The cup is a interesting variation without the small loop for the strap to go through. The cup is dated 1944 indicating production in early 1945. The canteen is unissued and would be very hard to upgrade.

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Aluminium buckle – Heer – Dransfeld & Co 1937

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS  belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Next to the German armed forces most paramilitary organizations had their own belt buckle too. I will mostly focus on the German military issue belt buckles but I will photograph private purchase parade buckles when I have the chance.

Branch: Wehrmacht (Heer)
Motto: Gott Mit Uns
Markings: Dransfeld & Co Menden Am M. 1937 on the tab
Maker: Dransfeld & Co Menden Am Main.
Year: 1937
Material: Die-struck aluminium
Paint: Green paint
Notes: 

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M37 lowboots – Bickel – 1939

Eversince 1937, Soldiers in the German army received a pair of Schnürschuhe (lowboots) next to their issue pair of Knobelbecher(Jackboots). They where first only meant as a part of the Drillichanzug(a offwhite uniform for basic training made of linen HBT) but as the war progressed the Schnürschuhe saw action on the front. They where meant to be worn with Gamaschen(Gaiters) to overlap the boots with the trousers.

The Schnurschuhe are always made following a certain army design. they close with a set of 5 eyelets and 4 speed lace hooks. Later in the war the 4 speed lace hooks where omitted and replaced by 4 eyelets. The sole consists of 3 major components; the heel, the base sole and the front half sole. The heel is constructed of a series of stacked leather pieces and has a steel heel iron. The base sole is slightly curved and stretches from front to back. It is both stitched and nailed with wooden pegs. The Stitches normally run in a “hidden stitch” left and right of the wooden pegs. The front half sole was affixed with wooden pegs and carries a number of steel hobnails. Though most boots come out of the factory untanned, the sides of the soles where always blackened. The soldiers where ordered to blacken the boots until it was discontinued in 1943.

This is the textbook German m37 lowboot. There are off course variations, especially later in the war.

Sole length: 29/5
Sole width:
4
Lot number:
370
Maker:
 Bickel
Month: March
Year: April 1939
Material: Unblackened leather
Notes: This pair still retains the pull straps in the back of the boot. This was discontinued somewhere in 1940.

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P38 holster – Softshell – dkk 44

During the war the Germans produced, captured and reissued many different pistols to their troops. Most if not all pistols had specific holsters and some pistols even had multiple kinds of holsters. Captured pistols where sometimes even fitted with new, German made holsters during the war. The standard pistol in the German army was the P.08 which in 1938 was replaced by the P.38. The P.08 was replaced but remained in production until 1945 by Krieghoff.

The Walther Pistole 38 (P.38) pistol was first introduced in 1938 as a replacement for the P.08. The P.38 was a more cost-efficient and more reliable in  war conditions such as mud and rain. The P.08 was a typical prewar German gun, over engineered to perfection with a sensitive toggle breech system that would malfunction when dirt was involved. The P.38 was a workhorse that did just what it was meant to do. It could handle most harsh battlefield conditions and as such the closed hardshell holster was discontinued later in the war and replaced for a open softshell holster. During the war 990.080 P.38 pistols where produced by Walther, Mauser and Spreewerk.

Pistol: Walther Pistole 38 (P.38)
Model holster: Softshell
Markings: dkk 44 P.38
Year: 1944
Maker: dkk 44 indicates production by Friedrich Offermann u. Söhne, Lederwarenfabrik, Bensberg
Material: Dyed leather
Notes: – This is the so called softshell variant, the more cost efficient latewar holster for the P38 pistol.

 

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Waffen-SS camouflage cap – M42 Tarnmütze – Plane tree 5/6 overprint

In 1942 the Waffen-SS redesigned the camouflage smock and helmet cover. Several changes where made such as the addition of foliage loops and waist pockets. Around this same time, the Waffen-SS introduced another ground breaking camouflage garment; the Tarnmütze. The camouflage field cap was first ordered to be produced with insignia inside and out by Himmler but this was discontinued quite early on. The Camouflage caps came with and without metal or sewn air vents. The caps where distributed widely and can be seen on many period pictures. These caps are rare.

Model: Waffen-SS M42 camouflage cap in Plane tree 5/6 overprint or Platanenmuster camouflage material
Camouflage: Plane tree 5/6 overprint or Platanenmuster camouflage material.
Air vents: none
Notes: On the front of a cap sewing remnants of a skull can be seen.

Lowlands collection

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Waffen-SS camouflage cap – M42 Tarnmütze – Blurred edge

In 1942 the Waffen-SS redesigned the camouflage smock and helmet cover. Several changes where made such as the addition of foliage loops and waist pockets. Around this same time, the Waffen-SS introduced another ground breaking camouflage garment; the Tarnmütze. The camouflage field cap was first ordered to be produced with insignia inside and out by Himmler but this was discontinued quite early on. The Camouflage caps came with and without metal or sewn air vents. The caps where distributed widely and can be seen on many period pictures. These caps are rare.

Model: Waffen-SS M42 camouflage cap in blurred edge or Rauchtarnmuster camouflage material
Camouflage: Blurred edge or Rauchtarnmuster
Air vents: metal
Notes: This cap was narrowed in the centre seam, a treat that can be seen on many sidecaps and M43 field caps.

Lowlands collection

 

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P38 holster – Hardshell – bml 43

During the war the Germans produced, captured and reissued many different pistols to their troops. Most if not all pistols had specific holsters and some pistols even had multiple kinds of holsters. Captured pistols where sometimes even fitted with new, German made holsters during the war. The standard pistol in the German army was the P.08 which in 1938 was replaced by the P.38. The P.08 was replaced but remained in production until 1945 by Krieghoff.

The Walther Pistole 38 (P.38) pistol was first introduced in 1938 as a replacement for the P.08. The P.38 was a more cost-efficient and more reliable in  war conditions such as mud and rain. The P.08 was a typical prewar German gun, over engineered to perfection with a sensitive toggle breech system that would malfunction when dirt was involved. The P.38 was a workhorse that did just what it was meant to do. It could handle most harsh battlefield conditions and as such the closed hardshell holster was discontinued later in the war and replaced for a open softshell holster. During the war 990.080 P.38 pistols where produced by Walther, Mauser and Spreewerk.

Pistol: Walther Pistole 38 (P.38)
Model holster: Hardshell
Markings: bml 43 P.38
Year: 1943
Maker: bml Hans Römer, Neu-Ulm.
Material: Dyed leather
Notes: –

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Tropical M31 Canteen – Labeflasche – RFI 41

The large canteen or Labeflasche is a canteen issued to mountain troops and medical personnel. These Gebirgsjäger and Sanitäter needed a larger capacity canteen. These canteens where made in 1, 1,5 and 2 liter capacity. They come in a variety of different straps. The mountain troops or Gebirgsjäger where issued with a large canteen that resembles the standard M31 Feldflasche with a single strap. The Sanitäter where issued one with a complete different strap. Their canteen has a harness that goes all around with a large carrying sling. The Labeflasche was made in aluminium (M31) and steel (M42). Most of these Labeflaschen where made until the end in aluminum but some steel variants are seen.

Markings: RFI 41 on the flask, cover and strap
Maker: RFI 41 indicates production by Rudolf Fissler KG, Idar-Oberstein.
Year: 1941
Strap: Canvas or “tropical”
Flask: Aluminium, 1 liter variant
Cup: Bakelite
Cover:
 Felt with four painted press studs
Other notes:

 

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P38 holster – Softshell – bml 44

During the war the Germans produced, captured and reissued many different pistols to their troops. Most if not all pistols had specific holsters and some pistols even had multiple kinds of holsters. Captured pistols where sometimes even fitted with new, German made holsters during the war. The standard pistol in the German army was the P.08 which in 1938 was replaced by the P.38. The P.08 was replaced but remained in production until 1945 by Krieghoff.

The Walther Pistole 38 (P.38) pistol was first introduced in 1938 as a replacement for the P.08. The P.38 was a more cost-efficient and more reliable in  war conditions such as mud and rain. The P.08 was a typical prewar German gun, over engineered to perfection with a sensitive toggle breech system that would malfunction when dirt was involved. The P.38 was a workhorse that did just what it was meant to do. It could handle most harsh battlefield conditions and as such the closed hardshell holster was discontinued later in the war and replaced for a open softshell holster. During the war 990.080 P.38 pistols where produced by Walther, Mauser and Spreewerk.

Pistol: Walther Pistole 38 (P.38)
Model holster: Softshell
Markings: bml 44 P.38
Year: 1944
Maker: Hans Römer, Neu-Ulm.
Material: Pebbled, Dyed leather
Notes: – This is the so called softshell variant, the more cost efficient latewar holster for the P38 pistol.

Hidde N. collection

 

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A-frame – tropical – Wersa München 1941

The A-frame or Gefechtsgepäck für Infanterie Schützenkompanien was a small canvas frame which was carried on the Y-strap. It was introduced in 1939. The A-frame was a way for soldiers to pack away their secondary necessities and to divide the weight more evenly on the equipment.

The A-frame carries the following items:

Messkit or M31 Kochgeschirr
Quarter shelter or M31 Zeltbahn
A-frame bag or Beutel zum Gefechtsgepäck

The A-frame bag or Beutel zum Gefechtsgepäck was used to carry a sweater, rifle cleaning kit and the Eiserne Portion.

The A-frame was made in a few varieties showing various ways of manufacture. Later in the war the bags where also made from recycled equipment.

Model: Tropical, full webbing construction
Markings: Wersa München 1941
Year: 1941
Maker: WERSA Lederwarenfabrik Hubert Werner Komm. -Ges., München 5, KLenzestrasse 34
Material: Webbing
Notes: A typical early tropical or DAK A-frame in good used condition. The A-frame is complete with the rare first pattern straps with woven prong holes. The A-frame is in good lightly used condition and nicely maker marked Wersa 1941, München. Extremely rare A-frame in very good condition that goes together with the first pattern tropical Y-straps!

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Pioneer saw – Marke Steigo – kkd 1942

The German Pioniertruppen or Pioneer troops where equipped to accomplish many different tasks. Where it laying mines, building (or demolishing) bridges, removing obstacles or constructing earth re-inforcments; the Pioneer troops carried all sorts of necessary equipment. They had a variety of different tools such as long spades, saws, explosives, detonators, and wire cutters.

The Pioniersäge was equipped with a scabbard that was produced from leather until 1940. After that the first Presstoff or artificial leather pouches came around. The scabbard was issued with a leather bayonet loop halfway down the scabbard. The scabbard features multiple reinforcements to keep the sharp saw from damaging it. On the top of the scabbard a narrow slit is placed which leads into a short metal inner sleeve and on the bottom of the scabbard a metal end piece. The belt loop on the top of the scabbard is made out of leather just as the bayonet loop, regardless what the main material of the scabbard is. The saw is featured with a wooden handle which nearly always has a missing piece at the exact same spot (See picture 5 on the left side of the handle).

Type of tool: Pioniersäge or pioneer saw
Markings: Marke Steigo 1943 H on the saw. kkd 1942 on the sheath indicating production by Lederwarenwerk Curt Vogel Cottbus.
Maker: Marke Steigt and Lederwarenwerk Curt Vogel, Cottbus
Year: 1943
Materials: Brown leather

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MP40 pouch – gfg 1943

The magazine pouch designed for the MP40 or Magazintasche MP38 u. 40 was first implemented in 1938 when the MP38 was introduced as the new weapon for squad leaders or Gruppenführer. The pouches came in sets of two and each pouch had 3 individual cells for single 32 round magazines. One left and one right pouch. The left pouch had a extra compartment where a speed loader was kept. A wide variety of different materials, colours and designs where produced throughout the war. Leather, rayon, canvas where the main components used in the manufacture of the pouches.

Markings: MP.38 U. 40 – gfg 1943 – WaA (unreadable)
Maker: Karl Hepting u. Co., Leder- u. Guertelfabrik, Stuttgart
Colour of main material: Olive canvas
Closing straps: Blackened leather with the untanned (brown) side front
Belt loops: Untanned (brown) leather
D-ring strap: Untanned (brown) leather
Notes:

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Medical large Canteen – Labeflasche – CFL 42

The large canteen or Labeflasche is a canteen issued to mountain troops and medical personnel. These Gebirgsjäger and Sanitäter needed a larger capacity canteen. These canteens where made in 1, 1,5 and 2 liter capacity. They come in a variety of different straps. The mountain troops or Gebirgsjäger where issued with a large canteen that resembles the standard M31 Feldflasche with a single strap. The Sanitäter where issued one with a complete different strap. Their canteen has a harness that goes all around with a large carrying sling. The Labeflasche was made in aluminium (M31) and steel (M42). Most of these Labeflaschen where made until the end in aluminum but some steel variants are seen.

Markings: CFL 42 on the flask and strap
Maker: CFL indicates production by Carl Feldhaus Aluminium-und Metallwerke, Lüdenscheid
Year: 1942
Strap: Pig skin black leather
Flask: Aluminium, 1 liter variant
Cup: bakelite
Cover:
 Felt with four painted press studs
Other notes:

 

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MP44 / STG44 pouch – unmarked

Markings: –
Maker: –
Colour of main material: Late war canvas without the typical red line which was woven in to indicate the length of fabric during fabric production.
Closing straps: Woven canvas with Lux points and riveted leather retaining straps
Belt loops: Canvas
D-ring strap: Canvas
Notes: This pouch was brought back by a US veteran together with a MP44 and is most likely made very late war. Interesting details are the pebbled leather used on the bottom and the lack of securing loops for the closing straps. Most likely a last ditch production when such loops where no longer deemed necessary.