Posted on

Waffen-SS camouflage cap – M42 Tarnmütze – Plane tree 5/6 overprint

In 1942 the Waffen-SS redesigned the camouflage smock and helmet cover. Several changes where made such as the addition of foliage loops and waist pockets. Around this same time, the Waffen-SS introduced another ground breaking camouflage garment; the Tarnmütze. The camouflage field cap was first ordered to be produced with insignia inside and out by Himmler but this was discontinued quite early on. The Camouflage caps came with and without metal or sewn air vents. The caps where distributed widely and can be seen on many period pictures. These caps are rare.

Model: Waffen-SS M42 camouflage cap in Plane tree 5/6 overprint or Platanenmuster camouflage material
Camouflage: Plane tree 5/6 overprint or Platanenmuster camouflage material.
Air vents: none
Notes: On the front of a cap sewing remnants of a skull can be seen.

Lowlands collection

Posted on

Waffen-SS camouflage cap – M42 Tarnmütze – Blurred edge

In 1942 the Waffen-SS redesigned the camouflage smock and helmet cover. Several changes where made such as the addition of foliage loops and waist pockets. Around this same time, the Waffen-SS introduced another ground breaking camouflage garment; the Tarnmütze. The camouflage field cap was first ordered to be produced with insignia inside and out by Himmler but this was discontinued quite early on. The Camouflage caps came with and without metal or sewn air vents. The caps where distributed widely and can be seen on many period pictures. These caps are rare.

Model: Waffen-SS M42 camouflage cap in blurred edge or Rauchtarnmuster camouflage material
Camouflage: Blurred edge or Rauchtarnmuster
Air vents: metal
Notes: This cap was narrowed in the centre seam, a treat that can be seen on many sidecaps and M43 field caps.

Lowlands collection

 

Posted on

P38 holster – Hardshell – bml 43

During the war the Germans produced, captured and reissued many different pistols to their troops. Most if not all pistols had specific holsters and some pistols even had multiple kinds of holsters. Captured pistols where sometimes even fitted with new, German made holsters during the war. The standard pistol in the German army was the P.08 which in 1938 was replaced by the P.38. The P.08 was replaced but remained in production until 1945 by Krieghoff.

The Walther Pistole 38 (P.38) pistol was first introduced in 1938 as a replacement for the P.08. The P.38 was a more cost-efficient and more reliable in  war conditions such as mud and rain. The P.08 was a typical prewar German gun, over engineered to perfection with a sensitive toggle breech system that would malfunction when dirt was involved. The P.38 was a workhorse that did just what it was meant to do. It could handle most harsh battlefield conditions and as such the closed hardshell holster was discontinued later in the war and replaced for a open softshell holster. During the war 990.080 P.38 pistols where produced by Walther, Mauser and Spreewerk.

Pistol: Walther Pistole 38 (P.38)
Model holster: Hardshell
Markings: bml 43 P.38
Year: 1943
Maker: bml Hans Römer, Neu-Ulm.
Material: Dyed leather
Notes: –

Posted on

Tropical M31 Canteen – Labeflasche – RFI 41

The large canteen or Labeflasche is a canteen issued to mountain troops and medical personnel. These Gebirgsjäger and Sanitäter needed a larger capacity canteen. These canteens where made in 1, 1,5 and 2 liter capacity. They come in a variety of different straps. The mountain troops or Gebirgsjäger where issued with a large canteen that resembles the standard M31 Feldflasche with a single strap. The Sanitäter where issued one with a complete different strap. Their canteen has a harness that goes all around with a large carrying sling. The Labeflasche was made in aluminium (M31) and steel (M42). Most of these Labeflaschen where made until the end in aluminum but some steel variants are seen.

Markings: RFI 41 on the flask, cover and strap
Maker: RFI 41 indicates production by Rudolf Fissler KG, Idar-Oberstein.
Year: 1941
Strap: Canvas or “tropical”
Flask: Aluminium, 1 liter variant
Cup: Bakelite
Cover:
 Felt with four painted press studs
Other notes:

 

Posted on

P38 holster – Softshell – bml 44

During the war the Germans produced, captured and reissued many different pistols to their troops. Most if not all pistols had specific holsters and some pistols even had multiple kinds of holsters. Captured pistols where sometimes even fitted with new, German made holsters during the war. The standard pistol in the German army was the P.08 which in 1938 was replaced by the P.38. The P.08 was replaced but remained in production until 1945 by Krieghoff.

The Walther Pistole 38 (P.38) pistol was first introduced in 1938 as a replacement for the P.08. The P.38 was a more cost-efficient and more reliable in  war conditions such as mud and rain. The P.08 was a typical prewar German gun, over engineered to perfection with a sensitive toggle breech system that would malfunction when dirt was involved. The P.38 was a workhorse that did just what it was meant to do. It could handle most harsh battlefield conditions and as such the closed hardshell holster was discontinued later in the war and replaced for a open softshell holster. During the war 990.080 P.38 pistols where produced by Walther, Mauser and Spreewerk.

Pistol: Walther Pistole 38 (P.38)
Model holster: Softshell
Markings: bml 44 P.38
Year: 1944
Maker: Hans Römer, Neu-Ulm.
Material: Pebbled, Dyed leather
Notes: – This is the so called softshell variant, the more cost efficient latewar holster for the P38 pistol.

Hidde N. collection

 

Posted on

A-frame – tropical – Wersa München 1941

The A-frame or Gefechtsgepäck für Infanterie Schützenkompanien was a small canvas frame which was carried on the Y-strap. It was introduced in 1939. The A-frame was a way for soldiers to pack away their secondary necessities and to divide the weight more evenly on the equipment.

The A-frame carries the following items:

Messkit or M31 Kochgeschirr
Quarter shelter or M31 Zeltbahn
A-frame bag or Beutel zum Gefechtsgepäck

The A-frame bag or Beutel zum Gefechtsgepäck was used to carry a sweater, rifle cleaning kit and the Eiserne Portion.

The A-frame was made in a few varieties showing various ways of manufacture. Later in the war the bags where also made from recycled equipment.

Model: Tropical, full webbing construction
Markings: Wersa München 1941
Year: 1941
Maker: WERSA Lederwarenfabrik Hubert Werner Komm. -Ges., München 5, KLenzestrasse 34
Material: Webbing
Notes: A typical early tropical or DAK A-frame in good used condition. The A-frame is complete with the rare first pattern straps with woven prong holes. The A-frame is in good lightly used condition and nicely maker marked Wersa 1941, München. Extremely rare A-frame in very good condition that goes together with the first pattern tropical Y-straps!

Posted on

Pioneer saw – Marke Steigo – kkd 1942

The German Pioniertruppen or Pioneer troops where equipped to accomplish many different tasks. Where it laying mines, building (or demolishing) bridges, removing obstacles or constructing earth re-inforcments; the Pioneer troops carried all sorts of necessary equipment. They had a variety of different tools such as long spades, saws, explosives, detonators, and wire cutters.

The Pioniersäge was equipped with a scabbard that was produced from leather until 1940. After that the first Presstoff or artificial leather pouches came around. The scabbard was issued with a leather bayonet loop halfway down the scabbard. The scabbard features multiple reinforcements to keep the sharp saw from damaging it. On the top of the scabbard a narrow slit is placed which leads into a short metal inner sleeve and on the bottom of the scabbard a metal end piece. The belt loop on the top of the scabbard is made out of leather just as the bayonet loop, regardless what the main material of the scabbard is. The saw is featured with a wooden handle which nearly always has a missing piece at the exact same spot (See picture 5 on the left side of the handle).

Type of tool: Pioniersäge or pioneer saw
Markings: Marke Steigo 1943 H on the saw. kkd 1942 on the sheath indicating production by Lederwarenwerk Curt Vogel Cottbus.
Maker: Marke Steigt and Lederwarenwerk Curt Vogel, Cottbus
Year: 1943
Materials: Brown leather

Posted on

MP40 pouch – gfg 1943

The magazine pouch designed for the MP40 or Magazintasche MP38 u. 40 was first implemented in 1938 when the MP38 was introduced as the new weapon for squad leaders or Gruppenführer. The pouches came in sets of two and each pouch had 3 individual cells for single 32 round magazines. One left and one right pouch. The left pouch had a extra compartment where a speed loader was kept. A wide variety of different materials, colours and designs where produced throughout the war. Leather, rayon, canvas where the main components used in the manufacture of the pouches.

Markings: MP.38 U. 40 – gfg 1943 – WaA (unreadable)
Maker: Karl Hepting u. Co., Leder- u. Guertelfabrik, Stuttgart
Colour of main material: Olive canvas
Closing straps: Blackened leather with the untanned (brown) side front
Belt loops: Untanned (brown) leather
D-ring strap: Untanned (brown) leather
Notes:

Posted on

Medical large Canteen – Labeflasche – CFL 42

The large canteen or Labeflasche is a canteen issued to mountain troops and medical personnel. These Gebirgsjäger and Sanitäter needed a larger capacity canteen. These canteens where made in 1, 1,5 and 2 liter capacity. They come in a variety of different straps. The mountain troops or Gebirgsjäger where issued with a large canteen that resembles the standard M31 Feldflasche with a single strap. The Sanitäter where issued one with a complete different strap. Their canteen has a harness that goes all around with a large carrying sling. The Labeflasche was made in aluminium (M31) and steel (M42). Most of these Labeflaschen where made until the end in aluminum but some steel variants are seen.

Markings: CFL 42 on the flask and strap
Maker: CFL indicates production by Carl Feldhaus Aluminium-und Metallwerke, Lüdenscheid
Year: 1942
Strap: Pig skin black leather
Flask: Aluminium, 1 liter variant
Cup: bakelite
Cover:
 Felt with four painted press studs
Other notes:

 

Posted on

MP44 / STG44 pouch – unmarked

Markings: –
Maker: –
Colour of main material: Late war canvas without the typical red line which was woven in to indicate the length of fabric during fabric production.
Closing straps: Woven canvas with Lux points and riveted leather retaining straps
Belt loops: Canvas
D-ring strap: Canvas
Notes: This pouch was brought back by a US veteran together with a MP44 and is most likely made very late war. Interesting details are the pebbled leather used on the bottom and the lack of securing loops for the closing straps. Most likely a last ditch production when such loops where no longer deemed necessary.

Posted on

Aluminum belt buckle – Waffen-SS – RZM 36/40 ᛋᛋ

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS  belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Next to the German armed forces most paramilitary organizations had their own belt buckle too. I will mostly focus on the German military issue belt buckles but I will photograph private purchase parade buckles when I have the chance.

Branch:
Waffen-SS
Motto: Meine Ehre heißt Treue
Markings: RZM 36/40 ᛋᛋ
Maker: Overhoff & Cie, Lüdenscheid
Year: 1940
Material: Aluminum
Paint: Silver
Notes:

 

 

Posted on

Aluminum belt buckle – Waffen-SS – RZM 36/38 ᛋᛋ

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS  belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Next to the German armed forces most paramilitary organizations had their own belt buckle too. I will mostly focus on the German military issue belt buckles but I will photograph private purchase parade buckles when I have the chance.

Branch:
Waffen-SS
Motto: Meine Ehre heißt Treue
Markings: RZM 36/38 ᛋᛋ
Maker: Overhoff & Cie, Lüdenscheid
Year: 1938
Material: Aluminum
Paint: Silver
Notes:

Posted on

Zinc belt buckle – Waffen-SS – RZM 822/42

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS  belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Branch: Waffen-SS
Motto: Meine Ehre heißt Treue
Markings: RZM 822/42 ᛋᛋ
Maker: 822 is presumed to be Richard Sieper or C.T. Dicke. 
Year: 1942
Material: Zinc
Paint: Silver
Notes:

 

Posted on

Helmet – M35 – ET62 – Kriegsmarine ex double decal

Arguably the helmet was the most recognizable part of the individual German soldiers appearance. With a design that derived from the type used in world war one, the German helmet offered more protection then ones used by it’s enemies. The quality field gray painted steel helmet with two decals and rolled steel rim and leather liner was a labor intensive product and simplified as the war progressed. The earliest model helmet used in world war two was the model 35 or M35 Stahlhelm. During the war the helmet was simplified in 2 stages. In 1940 the airvents changed from separate rivets affixed to the helmet shell to stamped in the main body of the shell. In 1942 a new model was introduced where the rim of the shell was left sharp and not rolled over as previous models. These models are known in the collector community as M40 and M42. The low sides that protect the neck and ears, the tell tale design that the Germans introduced in 1935 can still be seen in modern day army helmets.

Model: M35 Kriegsmarine (navy)
Decal: Kriegsmarine
Paint:
1. Factory applied dull olive paint
Markings: ET64
Shell Maker: Eisenhüttenwerke, Thale.
Size: Shellsize 62, headsize 53 cm
Batch number: 4452
Notes: The helmet is marked ET62 indicating production by Eisenhüttenwerke, Thale and has a size 55 liner. The helmet retains its strong golden Kriegsmarine decal and a per regulation wartime removed tricolor decal. The helmet still retains its original olive paint up to 90%. Inside the helmet has its original reinforced liner with a damaged chinstrap. A stunning Kriegsmarine M35 helmet with a strong golden decal!

Posted on

Field made camouflage trousers made from Heer Splittertarn Zeltbahn material

A nice and original pair of private or “field” made Splittertarncamouflage trousers. The trousers are in lightly worn condition and show multiple repairs. These trousers where often made and worn by officers/ snipers or like the period image; Fallschirmjaeger. The trousers are made from early Heer Splittertarn Zeltbahn material and still have a lot of color and character to them.

Posted on

Equipment belt – 0/0676/0120

The standard Equipment belt or Koppelriemen kept all the equipment together and is to be considered one of the key elements. Finding a nice one can be hard nowadays and reproductions are plenty. Right up to 1943 the early model was produced with a leather tongue with a series of holes on the inside which kept the prongs of the belt buckle. The later models where simplified whereas this leather tongue was omitted and the holes simply cut through the belt. The hook for the belt buckle was first produced in aluminium later to be replaced by steel. The belts are adjustable and marked in size ranging between 75 and 120 centimeters. These belts also came in a tropical variant made from webbing material. These are always made in the configuration with the leather tongue.

Colour: Black
Leather: Black tanned leather
Markings: 0/0676/0120
Maker: 0/0676/0120 indicates production in the town of Offenbach(Hessen) where multiple leather and equipment producers where based.
Year: 
Hardware: Steel hook marked RZM M4/22 indicating production by Christian Theodor Dicke, Lüdenscheid. 
Size: 90 centimeters

Posted on

Steel belt buckle – Waffen-SS – RZM 155/40 ᛋᛋ

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS  belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Next to the German armed forces most paramilitary organizations had their own belt buckle too. I will mostly focus on the German military issue belt buckles but I will photograph private purchase parade buckles when I have the chance.

Branch: Waffen-SS
Motto: 
Meine Ehre heißt Treue
Markings: RZM 155/40 ᛋᛋ
Maker: 
Assmann & Söhne, Lüdenscheid 
Year: 
1940
Material: 
Stamped steel, zinc coated and painted silver
Paint: 
Silver
Notes: 
This mint buckle is in unissued condition, the silver paint that usually is missing still retains for 99%. The buckle still retains its original factory label. Very hard to find Waffen-SS belt buckle with the original factory paper RZM label. This is the last steel model from 1940 with the marking near the catch. Somewhere in 1940 the place of marking was changed to underneath the prong bar.

Posted on

MKB42 / MP43 pouch – jmb 1943

Markings: Mkb 42 – jmb 1943
Maker: Lederwaren – Industrie Stefanski in Posen, Berliner Straße 5
Colour of main material: Green canvas with the typical red line which was woven in to indicate the length of fabric during fabric production.
Closing strap: Brown leather
Belt loop: Brown leather
D-ring strap: Brown leather
Notes: Probably one of the rarest magazine pouches produced during the second world war. These magazine pouches for the MKb 42 are as rare as the weapons itself.

Posted on

MP44 / STG44 pouch – kkd 1944

Markings: unmarked
Maker: These pouches are usually marked fuq or kkd indicating production by Wilhelm Stern, Lederwarenfabrik, Posen. 
Colour of main material: Green canvas recycled from other equipment
Closing straps: Brown leather
Belt loops: Brown leather
D-ring strap: Brown leather
Notes: These magazine pouches where completely produced from recycled materials. One can easily tell the stitching holes where the parts where first sewn in another piece of equipment. These pouches are usually marked fuq or kkd indicating production by Wilhelm Stern, Lederwarenfabrik, Posen.

 

 

Posted on

MP44 / STG44 pouch – unmarked

Markings: –
Maker: This model pouch is attributed to the maker E. G. Leuner, Bautzen and are often found to be marked ros 1944 and marked on the side flaps.
Colour of main material: Late war canvas without the typical red line which was woven in to indicate the length of fabric during fabric production.
Closing straps: Woven canvas with Lux points and riveted leather retaining straps
Belt loops: Canvas
D-ring strap: Canvas
Notes:

Posted on

MP44 / STG44 pouches – jwa 44

Markings:  jwa 44
Maker: jwa indicates production by  Moritz Stecher, Lederwerk, Freiburg
Colour of main material: Late war canvas with the typical red line which was woven in to indicate the length of fabric during fabric production.
Closing straps: Woven canvas with lux points and riveted leather retaining straps
Belt loops: Canvas
D-ring strap: Canvas
Notes:

Posted on

Aluminium buckle – Heer – R. Sieper & Sohne 1936

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS  belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Next to the German armed forces most paramilitary organizations had their own belt buckle too. I will mostly focus on the German military issue belt buckles but I will photograph private purchase parade buckles when I have the chance.

Branch: Wehrmacht (Heer)
Motto: Gott Mit Uns
Markings: R. Sieper & Sohne 1936 on the tab and RS&S on the buckle
Maker: Richard Sieper & Sohne 
Year: 1936
Material: Molded and shaped aluminium
Paint: Green paint
Notes: A stunning belt and buckle set which are both unit marked 8./J.R.42 indicating this belt and buckle was issued to a soldier in 8. Kompanie Infanterie Regiment 42. The buckle still retains up to 90% of its original green paint and is nicely marked R. Sieper & Sohne Lüdenscheid 1936.

Posted on

Alpacca buckle – Hitlerjugend – RZM M4/72

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.c
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS  belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Branch:
 Hitlerjugend
Motto: Blut und Ehre
Markings: RZM M4/72
Maker: Wilhelm Deumer, Lüdenscheid
Year: 1940-1943
Material: Alpacca which is a form of Nickel
Paint: –
Notes:

 

Posted on

Type 1 Helmet cover – Waffen-SS – Lateral Plane tree

Arguably the helmet was the most recognizable part of the individual German soldiers appearance. With a design that derived from the type used in world war one, the German helmet offered more protection then ones used by it’s enemies. The quality field gray painted steel helmet with two decals and rolled steel rim and leather liner was a labor intensive product and simplified as the war progressed. The earliest model helmet used in world war two was the model 35 or M35 Stahlhelm. During the war the helmet was simplified in 2 stages. In 1940 the airvents changed from separate rivets affixed to the helmet shell to stamped in the main body of the shell. In 1942 a new model was introduced where the rim of the shell was left sharp and not rolled over as previous models. These models are known in the collector community as M40 and M42. The low sides that protect the neck and ears, the tell tale design that the Germans introduced in 1935 can still be seen in modern day army helmets.

Model: Type 1 Waffen-SS camouflage cover without foliage loops Lateral plane tree Tarnbezug or helmet cover
Markings:
 –
Maker: 
Size: Photographed on a shell sized 64
Hooks: Anodized aluminum
Notes: “Lateral Plane Tree” The first camouflage pattern to go into mass-production, this pattern was based directly off of the same art as the block pattern with a softer, less-jagged appearance. Implemented in 1938, this pattern was intended for use as smocks and helmet covers only. Because of the very short repeat (only 32″ tall which is the height of a smock) this pattern was not intended for use as zelts. While the smocks were, for the most part, only seen during the early campaigns in the west, the pattern is actually extremely common throughout the war in the form of helmet covers and m42 caps. Fully hand-screened using three colors.

 

Posted on

Type 2 Helmet cover – Waffen-SS – plane tree 5/6

Arguably the helmet was the most recognizable part of the individual German soldiers appearance. With a design that derived from the type used in world war one, the German helmet offered more protection then ones used by it’s enemies. The quality field gray painted steel helmet with two decals and rolled steel rim and leather liner was a labor intensive product and simplified as the war progressed. The earliest model helmet used in world war two was the model 35 or M35 Stahlhelm. During the war the helmet was simplified in 2 stages. In 1940 the airvents changed from separate rivets affixed to the helmet shell to stamped in the main body of the shell. In 1942 a new model was introduced where the rim of the shell was left sharp and not rolled over as previous models. These models are known in the collector community as M40 and M42. The low sides that protect the neck and ears, the tell tale design that the Germans introduced in 1935 can still be seen in modern day army helmets.

Model: Type 2 Waffen-SS camouflage cover with foliage loops Plane tree 5/6 or Platanenmuster Tarnbezug or helmet cover
Markings:
 –
Maker: 
Size: Photographed on a shell sized 64 (fits a size 66)
Hooks: Anodized aluminum
Notes: This Tarnbezug is made out of Plane tree 5/6 or Platanenmuster camouflage material. It is a specific camouflage intended for the Waffen-SS. The left side of the cover is made from Oak A or Eichenlaubmuster material.

 

Posted on

Type 2 Helmet cover – Waffen-SS – Oak A

Arguably the helmet was the most recognizable part of the individual German soldiers appearance. With a design that derived from the type used in world war one, the German helmet offered more protection then ones used by it’s enemies. The quality field gray painted steel helmet with two decals and rolled steel rim and leather liner was a labor intensive product and simplified as the war progressed. The earliest model helmet used in world war two was the model 35 or M35 Stahlhelm. During the war the helmet was simplified in 2 stages. In 1940 the airvents changed from separate rivets affixed to the helmet shell to stamped in the main body of the shell. In 1942 a new model was introduced where the rim of the shell was left sharp and not rolled over as previous models. These models are known in the collector community as M40 and M42. The low sides that protect the neck and ears, the tell tale design that the Germans introduced in 1935 can still be seen in modern day army helmets.

Model: Type 2 Waffen-SS camouflage cover with foliage loops  Oak B or Beringtes Eichenlaubmuster
Markings:
 –
Maker: 
Size: Photographed on a shell sized 66
Hooks: Parkerized steel
Notes: This cover was made from Oak A or Eichenlaubmuster camouflage material. It is a specific camouflage intended for the Waffen-SS made between 1942 and 1945.

Posted on

Type 2 Helmet cover – Waffen-SS – plane tree 5/6

Arguably the helmet was the most recognizable part of the individual German soldiers appearance. With a design that derived from the type used in world war one, the German helmet offered more protection then ones used by it’s enemies. The quality field gray painted steel helmet with two decals and rolled steel rim and leather liner was a labor intensive product and simplified as the war progressed. The earliest model helmet used in world war two was the model 35 or M35 Stahlhelm. During the war the helmet was simplified in 2 stages. In 1940 the airvents changed from separate rivets affixed to the helmet shell to stamped in the main body of the shell. In 1942 a new model was introduced where the rim of the shell was left sharp and not rolled over as previous models. These models are known in the collector community as M40 and M42. The low sides that protect the neck and ears, the tell tale design that the Germans introduced in 1935 can still be seen in modern day army helmets.

Model: Type 2 Waffen-SS camouflage cover with foliage loops Plane tree 5/6 or Platanenmuster Tarnbezug or helmet cover
Markings:
 –
Maker: 
Size: Photographed on a shell sized 64 (fits a size 66)
Hooks: Anodized aluminum
Notes: This Tarnbezug is made out of Plane tree 5/6 or Platanenmuster camouflage material. It is a specific camouflage intended for the Waffen-SS.

Posted on

Type 2 Helmet cover – Waffen-SS – Oak B

Arguably the helmet was the most recognizable part of the individual German soldiers appearance. With a design that derived from the type used in world war one, the German helmet offered more protection then ones used by it’s enemies. The quality field gray painted steel helmet with two decals and rolled steel rim and leather liner was a labor intensive product and simplified as the war progressed. The earliest model helmet used in world war two was the model 35 or M35 Stahlhelm. During the war the helmet was simplified in 2 stages. In 1940 the airvents changed from separate rivets affixed to the helmet shell to stamped in the main body of the shell. In 1942 a new model was introduced where the rim of the shell was left sharp and not rolled over as previous models. These models are known in the collector community as M40 and M42. The low sides that protect the neck and ears, the tell tale design that the Germans introduced in 1935 can still be seen in modern day army helmets.

Model: Type 2 Waffen-SS camouflage cover with foliage loops  Oak B or Beringtes Eichenlaubmuster
Markings:
 –
Maker: 
Size: Photographed on a shell sized 66
Hooks: Parkerized steel
Notes: This cover was made from Oak B or Beringtes Eichenlaubmuster camouflage material. It is a specific camouflage intended for the Waffen-SS made between 1942 and 1945. On top of the cover, a stamp for Statnifilm can be seen which is a film company from the 1950’s.

Posted on

M31 Messkit – CFL 41

The M31 messkit or “Kochgeschirre M 31 (Alum.)” was a 1.6 liter capacity cooking pot carried on the left side of the breadbag. The messkit was a clever engineered piece of equipment capable of serving as a cooking or eating pot. The early models also had indicating marks on the front, under the handle on which could measure the size of the contents. It had a cleverly placed wire handle on which the messkit could be hung above a fire. The messkits came in a big variety of colours and materials. At first the messkits where nearly completely made out of aluminium except the wire handle. From around 1940 onwards the handle on the lid was made from steel. In 1942 the simplified steel model “Kochgeschirre M 42 (Eis.)” was introduced. It had less and less well crafted details and the production became a hurry. I found the designation “M42” in the production numbers of the German Industry.

Model: M31
Marking: CFL 41
Maker: Carl Feldhaus Aluminium-und Metallwerke, Lüdenscheid
Material: Painted aluminium
Colour: Feldgrau
Notes: The messkit is nicely named to Hauptmann Porner on the back.

Posted on

Straight E-tool cover – evg 43

The straight handled shovel or Kleines Schanzzeug was the primary entrenching tool within the German army. It was first introduced in the German army before the first world war after a Danish design by Mads Linnemann. The Germans used several types of straight handled shovels during the war. The most commonly seen type of straight handled shovel used by the Germans has a spot welded blade that has been folded at the top. Next to the use as a tool for digging, it could be used to hack wood and to some extent as a close combat weapon.

The cover was initially fully made out of leather. It consists of 2 carrying loops and a strap to tie down the handle. In the design of the strap a certain amount of extra length was accounted for so a bayonet could be tied to the handle of the E-tool. In 1943 the main material was changed from leather to Ersatzmaterial(artificial leather) completely. The covers came in a few variations in material, colour, construction, buckle and leather colour.

Markings: evg 43
Maker: evg indicates production by Max Oswald, Lederwaren-und Reiseartikel-Fabrik, Karlsruhe
Material: Ersatzmaterial, Pressed cardboard.
Location of loops: Sewn inside
Buckle: Painted black, with roller.
Notes:

Posted on

Tan straight E-tool cover – fuq 1943

The straight handled shovel or Kleines Schanzzeug was the primary entrenching tool within the German army. It was first introduced in the German army before the first world war after a Danish design by Mads Linnemann. The Germans used several types of straight handled shovels during the war. The most commonly seen type of straight handled shovel used by the Germans has a spot welded blade that has been folded at the top. Next to the use as a tool for digging, it could be used to hack wood and to some extent as a close combat weapon.

The cover was initially fully made out of leather. It consists of 2 carrying loops and a strap to tie down the handle. In the design of the strap a certain amount of extra length was accounted for so a bayonet could be tied to the handle of the E-tool. In 1943 the main material was changed from leather to Ersatzmaterial(artificial leather) completely. The covers came in a few variations in material, colour, construction, buckle and leather colour.

Markings: fuq 1943
Maker: fuq indicates production by Cottbusser Lederwarenwerk Curt Vogel K.G., Cottbus
Year: 1943
Material: Tan Ersatzmaterial, Pressed cardboard.
Location of loops: Sewn inside
Buckle: Painted black
Notes:


Posted on

Camouflaged gasmask canister – Two tone camouflage Normandy KIA

Throughout world war two the German army issued and carried gas masks. After the terrible experiences in world war one these where thought of as one of the most important pieces of equipment issued. The Germans utilized every gasmask with a metal canister so to keep the gasmask in good usable condition. The metal cases where first introduced in world war one and further evolved through the Reichswehr and ultimately in 1935 by the Wehrmacht. Several small changes where made to the canisters appearance ranging from the length of the canister to sealing the lid of the canister to make it dust tight.

Notes: 

A very nice original camouflage gasmask canister Id’ed to Hans Voggenreiter who was born 7-11-1925 and killed in action on 28-6-1944 in Normandy. Hans Voggenreiter was a Gefreiter in Grenadier Regiment 957. Hans Voggenreiter is buried in Orglandes, Normandy. The exact location on the burial site is: Block 15 Row 3 Grave 99.

This unit saw heavy action in Normandy and was destroyed in the Falaise pocket. The exterior of the canister still sees around 80% of its original camouflage paint with bright colours. The Canister is a nice one looker original and has some very nice Normandy provenance. The Feldpost number refers to the following units, but most importantly the latter Reserve-Grenadier-Bataillon 468 which is the replacement battalion of the 363 Infanterie Division which was destroyed in the Falaise gap

Feldpost Number :
(28.4.1940-14.9.1940) 2. Flughafen-Betriebs-Kompanie Stuka-Geschwader186,
(27.1.1942-14.7.1942) gestrichen,
(15.7.1942-24.1.1943) Stab u. 1.-4. Kompanie Reserve-Infanterie-Bataillon 468,
(1.8.1943-23.3.1944) 3.7.1944 Stab u. 1.-4. Kompanie Reserve-Grenadier-Bataillon 468,
(24.3.1944-6.11.1944) 30.6.1944 gestrichen

 

Posted on

M31 Messkit – HRE 41 – original factory wrapper

The M31 messkit or “Kochgeschirre M 31 (Alum.)” was a 1.6 liter capacity cooking pot carried on the left side of the breadbag. The messkit was a clever engineered piece of equipment capable of serving as a cooking or eating pot. The early models also had indicating marks on the front, under the handle on which could measure the size of the contents. It had a cleverly placed wire handle on which the messkit could be hung above a fire. The messkits came in a big variety of colours and materials. At first the messkits where nearly completely made out of aluminium except the wire handle. From around 1940 onwards the handle on the lid was made from steel. In 1942 the simplified steel model “Kochgeschirre M 42 (Eis.)” was introduced. It had less and less well crafted details and the production became a hurry. I found the designation “M42” in the production numbers of the German Industry.

Model: M31
Marking: HRE 41
Maker: Heinrich Ritter, Esslingen
Material: Painted aluminium
Colour: Olive
Notes: The messkit is in near perfect condition and comes with a original Ritter Aluminium factory wrapper.

Posted on

Mountain troop boots – Handte & Schneider 1943

Eversince 1937, Soldiers in the German army received a pair of Schnürschuhe (lowboots) next to their issue pair of Knobelbecher(Jackboots). They where first only meant as a part of the Drillichanzug(a offwhite uniform for basic training made of linen HBT) but as the war progressed the Schnürschuhe saw action on the front. They where meant to be worn with Gamaschen(Gaiters) to overlap the boots with the trousers.

The Gebirgsjäger received a pair of army issued mountain boots designed to cope with the harsh terrain in the mountains. The boots are constructed in a in a much sturdier design then the regular M37 Schnürschuhe and are executed with metal cleats to grip onto rock surfaces better. The leather used in the construction is thicker then that used in the M37 Schnürschuhe. The top of the boots is bordered with a piece of Feldgrau wool to make the rough edge of the thick leather not cut in the ankle. The Gebirgsjäger boots are meant to be worn with Wickelgamaschen or Steirische Gamaschen. 

Maker: Handte & Schneider
Year: 1943
Material: blackened leather
Notes:

 

Posted on

Helmet – M42 – EF64 – Heer single decal

Arguably the helmet was the most recognizable part of the individual German soldiers appearance. With a design that derived from the type used in world war one, the German helmet offered more protection then ones used by it’s enemies. The quality field gray painted steel helmet with two decals and rolled steel rim and leather liner was a labor intensive product and simplified as the war progressed. The earliest model helmet used in world war two was the model 35 or M35 Stahlhelm. During the war the helmet was simplified in 2 stages. In 1940 the airvents changed from separate rivets affixed to the helmet shell to stamped in the main body of the shell. In 1942 a new model was introduced where the rim of the shell was left sharp and not rolled over as previous models. These models are known in the collector community as M40 and M42. The low sides that protect the neck and ears, the tell tale design that the Germans introduced in 1935 can still be seen in modern day army helmets.

Model: M42
Decal: Heer (army)
Paint: Factory applied dull field gray or Feldgrau paint with rough aluminium oxide
Markings: EF64 and 39692 in the back
Shell Maker: Emaillierwerke A.G., Fulda.
Size: Shellsize 64, headsize 57 cm
Batch number: 39692
Year: –
Notes:

 

 

Posted on

Helmet – M42 – NS64 – Single decal Luftwaffe

Arguably the helmet was the most recognizable part of the individual German soldiers appearance. With a design that derived from the type used in world war one, the German helmet offered more protection then ones used by it’s enemies. The quality field gray painted steel helmet with two decals and rolled steel rim and leather liner was a labor intensive product and simplified as the war progressed. The earliest model helmet used in world war two was the model 35 or M35 Stahlhelm. During the war the helmet was simplified in 2 stages. In 1940 the airvents changed from separate rivets affixed to the helmet shell to stamped in the main body of the shell. In 1942 a new model was introduced where the rim of the shell was left sharp and not rolled over as previous models. These models are known in the collector community as M40 and M42. The low sides that protect the neck and ears, the tell tale design that the Germans introduced in 1935 can still be seen in modern day army helmets.

Model: M42 Luftwaffe
Decal: 
Luftwaffe
Paint: 
Factory applied textured Graublau paint with a Luftwaffe decal
Markings:
 NS64 D238
Maker: Vereinigte Deutsche Nikelwerke, Schwerte.
Size: Shellsize 64, headsize 57 cm
Batch number: D238
Year: 1944
Notes: –

 

Posted on

MP40 pouch – Otto Koberstein 1942

The magazine pouch designed for the MP40 or Magazintasche MP38 u. 40 was first implemented in 1938 when the MP38 was introduced as the new weapon for squad leaders or Gruppenführer. The pouches came in sets of two and each pouch had 3 individual cells for single 32 round magazines. One left and one right pouch. The left pouch had a extra compartment where a speed loader was kept. A wide variety of different materials, colours and designs where produced throughout the war. Leather, rayon, canvas where the main components used in the manufacture of the pouches.

Markings: Otto Koberstein, Landsberg 1942
Maker: Otto Koberstein, Landsberg
Year: 1942
Colour of main material: Green canvas
Closing straps: Blackened leather
Belt loops: Blackened leather
D-ring strap: Blackened leather
Notes:

Posted on

G43 pouch – fuq 1944 – used pouch

The ammunition pouch for the G43 (Gewehr 43) semi automatic rifle was executed in many different materials. Vinyl, leather, rubber and canvas are some of the materials observed. Each soldier equipped with the G43 received one G43 pouch and one K98 pouch. The G43 could be loaded with both magazines and clips, hence the combined pouches. The G43 pouch has two separate cells which each could hold one ten-round magazine.

Material: Tan smooth vinyl with smooth black leather closing straps and rayon belt loops
Maker: Curt Vogel, Cottbuss
Marking: fuq 1944
Year: 1944

This pouch shows actual wear and was found 20 years before the hoard find in Ukraine.

Posted on

MG 34/42 ammunition carrying strap – Tragegurt 34 – woven recycled material

The Germans where the first to fully implement a general-purpose machine gun or Einheitsmaschinengewehr. This machine gun was meant to be in the centre of every infantry group or Gruppe bringing more firepower to the front.

Whilst other armies still struggled with multiple machine guns for multiple roles the German army was (as so much of the times) way ahead. With the implementation of Blitzkrieg tactics the Germans needed a machine gun that was light, accurate, reliable and had a high rate of fire. The MG 34 was a excellent air-cooled, recoil operated light machine gun that could fire semi- and automatic at 850 rounds per minute. It could be easily adapted to fulfill different roles on the battlefield. As a light machine gun it was light enough to carry around and fast enough to lay down suppressive fire. On a tripod with the addition of a sight it was a anti-aircraft weapon and on the MG 34 Lafette a excellent sustained-fire machine gun. The Germans where the first to fully implement the tactic that every infantry squad or Gruppe worked around a light machine gun. During the war when materials became more scarce and production had to be sped up the Germans developed the MG 42. This new machine gun had a even more devastating rate of fire of 1200 rounds per minute. It was efficiently made of stamped steel and had a different bolt.

With this new machine gun a whole series of accessories was introduced.

The Patronenkasten 34 was developed to be a lightweight ammunition box to carry ammunition for the MG 34. It was capable to carry 300 belted 7,92 mm rounds. The first models where manufactured in Aluminium and as the war started the first steel variants where made. The Patronenkasten 34 was well designed but had a complex design with a slanted lid and a clasp closure which often broke. In 1941 or the Patronenkasten 41 in steel was designed. This steel ammunition box had a straight lid and a clasp closure on the side. Also it featured a rubber seal in the lid making it waterproof. On the short sides they where marked Patr. Kast. 41 f. M.G. which is short for Patronenkasten 41 für Maschinengewehr. To carry the Patronenkasten a special strap was further developed from its Reichswehr predecessor. The Tragegurt 34 consisted of a adjustable strap with two hooks on each end and one belt hook sewn in on one end.

Model : Tragegurt 34
Markings :
Maker : 
Year : –
Material : Woven straps of recycled material
Paint: Green painted hardware
Notes :
 This woven material most probably was recycled from various items.

Posted on

MP44 / STG44 pouch – jwa 44

Markings: jwa 44
Maker: jwa indicates production by  Moritz Stecher, Lederwerk, Freiburg
Colour of main material: Late war canvas with the typical red line which was woven in to indicate the length of fabric during fabric production.
Closing straps: Woven canvas with leather retaining straps
Belt loops: Canvas
D-ring strap: Canvas
Notes: The pouch was found in a abandoned house in Liepaja which is located in the area known as Kurland. This pouch has never been in a collection before and would make a great addition to a combat mannequin!

 

Posted on

M31 Canteen – Labeflasche – EEF 43

The large canteen or Labeflasche is a canteen issued to mountain troops and medical personnel. These Gebirgsjäger and Sanitäter needed a larger capacity canteen. These canteens where made in 1, 1,5 and 2 liter capacity. They come in a variety of different straps. The mountain troops or Gebirgsjäger where issued with a large canteen that resembles the standard M31 Feldflasche with a single strap. The Sanitäter where issued one with a complete different strap. Their canteen has a harness that goes all around with a large carrying sling. The Labeflasche was made in aluminium (M31) and steel (M42). Most of these Labeflaschen where made until the end in aluminum but some steel variants are seen.

Markings: EEF 43 on the flask and strap
Maker: EEF 43 indicates production by Ewald Eigenbrod Aluminium-und Metallwarenfabrik, Freiling.
Year: 1943
Strap: Leather
Flask: Aluminium, 1 liter variant
Cup: Olive painted aluminum
Cover:
 Felt with four painted press studs
Other notes:

 

Posted on

M37 lowboots – Rheinberger Schuhfabrik – 1942

Eversince 1937, Soldiers in the German army received a pair of Schnürschuhe (lowboots) next to their issue pair of Knobelbecher(Jackboots). They where first only meant as a part of the Drillichanzug(a offwhite uniform for basic training made of linen HBT) but as the war progressed the Schnürschuhe saw action on the front. They where meant to be worn with Gamaschen(Gaiters) to overlap the boots with the trousers.

The Schnurschuhe are always made following a certain army design. they close with a set of 5 eyelets and 4 speed lace hooks. Later in the war the 4 speed lace hooks where omitted and replaced by 4 eyelets. The sole consists of 3 major components; the heel, the base sole and the front half sole. The heel is constructed of a series of stacked leather pieces and has a steel heel iron. The base sole is slightly curved and stretches from front to back. It is both stitched and nailed with wooden pegs. The Stitches normally run in a “hidden stitch” left and right of the wooden pegs. The front half sole was affixed with wooden pegs and carries a number of steel hobnails. Though most boots come out of the factory untanned, the sides of the soles where always blackened. The soldiers where ordered to blacken the boots until it was discontinued in 1943.

This is the textbook German m37 lowboot. There are off course variations, especially later in the war.

Sole length: 29
Sole width:
5
Lot number:
5413
Markings: Rheinberger logo
Maker:
Eduard Rheinberg AG, Pirmasens / Rheinberger Schuhfabrik
Month: March
Year: 1942
Material: Blackened leather
Notes: 

 

Posted on

Helmet – M35 – ET64 – Kriegsmarine double decal field repaint

Arguably the helmet was the most recognizable part of the individual German soldiers appearance. With a design that derived from the type used in world war one, the German helmet offered more protection then ones used by it’s enemies. The quality field gray painted steel helmet with two decals and rolled steel rim and leather liner was a labor intensive product and simplified as the war progressed. The earliest model helmet used in world war two was the model 35 or M35 Stahlhelm. During the war the helmet was simplified in 2 stages. In 1940 the airvents changed from separate rivets affixed to the helmet shell to stamped in the main body of the shell. In 1942 a new model was introduced where the rim of the shell was left sharp and not rolled over as previous models. These models are known in the collector community as M40 and M42. The low sides that protect the neck and ears, the tell tale design that the Germans introduced in 1935 can still be seen in modern day army helmets.

Model: M35 Kriegsmarine (navy)
Decal: Kriegsmarine
Paint:
1. Factory applied dull field gray or Feldgrau gray paint with rough aluminium oxide with a factory applied Kriegsmarine decal.
2. Remnants of whitewash
Markings: ET64
Shell Maker: Eisenhüttenwerke, Thale.
Size: Shellsize 64, headsize 56 cm
Batch number: 3670
Notes:  This helmet was found September/October 2017 when my friend was demolishing a building in Norway. To put it in his words literally ” I tore down the attic and this thing came rolling out “.

The helmet is a ET64 with lot number 3670. The helmet features its original Kriegsmarine decals, of which one was painted over. The helmet was spray painted in a grey paint, inside and out. The helmet still retains its original liner with the name Seckel. Inside the helmet, under the leather the dome stamp still retains visible and there is another name, in pencil inside the dome. The chinstrap is original to the helmet and is Kriegsmarine marked too. The KM decal has the thin black border around the eagle and the swastika and was masked during the grey repaint. The decal has a strong, deep golden tint as would be expected of a KM helmet.

 

Posted on

Helmet – M35 – SE62 – Three tone “Normandy” camouflage

Arguably the helmet was the most recognizable part of the individual German soldiers appearance. With a design that derived from the type used in world war one, the German helmet offered more protection then ones used by it’s enemies. The quality field gray painted steel helmet with two decals and rolled steel rim and leather liner was a labor intensive product and simplified as the war progressed. The earliest model helmet used in world war two was the model 35 or M35 Stahlhelm. During the war the helmet was simplified in 2 stages. In 1940 the airvents changed from separate rivets affixed to the helmet shell to stamped in the main body of the shell. In 1942 a new model was introduced where the rim of the shell was left sharp and not rolled over as previous models. These models are known in the collector community as M40 and M42. The low sides that protect the neck and ears, the tell tale design that the Germans introduced in 1935 can still be seen in modern day army helmets.

Model: M35 Heer/KM
Decal: Decals are period removed
Paint:1. Factory applied dull green paint with factory applied Heer decals.
2. Three tone spray painted Normandy camouflage
Markings:
 SE62 6380
Maker: Sächsische Emaillier und Stanzwerke A.G.
Size: Shellsize 62, headsize 55 cm
Batch number: 389
Notes:

S. van Wingerden collection

Posted on

Folding E-tool – agv 42

The folding shovel or Klappspaten was the another infantry shovel introduced into the German army first in 1938. The German folding shovel was the first ever army spade with a folding mechanism. After it’s design the Americans copied the design and made their own (M1943 entrenching tool) as a new standard infantry E-tool. The Germans issued these folding shovels just the same as the straight shovels.

The folding shovel features a blued, stamped steel blade. The blade can be locked in 3 positions through means of a Bakelite locking knob. The blade can be unfolded fully or in a 90 degree angle to hack in the ground. The blade can be locked shut when carried in the cover.

The covers came in two models and in two materials. The first model differs from the second through the size and type of the closing flap. The first model had a flap that completely covered the top edge of the shovel, closing off the top of the cover completely. The second model was simplified and as such it just consisted of a single strap over the centre of the top of the cover. The covers where first seen made out of artificial leather or Ersatzmaterial in 1938.

Markings: agv 42
Maker: Berg & Co solingen
Year: 1942
Notes: –

Posted on

Folding E-tool cover – jsd 42

The folding shovel or Klappspaten was the another infantry shovel introduced into the German army first in 1938. The German folding shovel was the first ever army spade with a folding mechanism. After it’s design the Americans copied the design and made their own (M1943 entrenching tool) as a new standard infantry E-tool. The Germans issued these folding shovels just the same as the straight shovels.

The folding shovel features a blued, stamped steel blade. The blade can be locked in 3 positions through means of a Bakelite locking knob. The blade can be unfolded fully or in a 90 degree angle to hack in the ground. The blade can be locked shut when carried in the cover.

The covers came in two models and in two materials. The first model differs from the second through the size and type of the closing flap. The first model had a flap that completely covered the top edge of the shovel, closing off the top of the cover completely. The second model was simplified and as such it just consisted of a single strap over the centre of the top of the cover. The covers where first seen made out of artificial leather or Ersatzmaterial in 1938.

Markings: jsd 42
Maker:  jsd indicates production by Gustav Reinhardt, Lederwarenfabrik, Berlin.
Model:  Second model with simplified closing flap
Material: Ersatzmaterial
Notes:

 

Posted on

M44 Greatcoat – Waffen-SS – ᛋᛋ-BW

Type of uniform: Waffen-SS M44 greatcoat or Tuchmantel 44
Material: Wool lined with rayon
Colour: Italian wool
Branch: Heer
Insignia: –
Year: 1944/1945
markings: ᛋᛋ-BW
Maker: ᛋᛋ-Bekleidungswerke
Depot: –
Notes:Heavily simplified, no more hooks on the lower corners of the fabric, no rear waistband, no French cuffs. Even the back of the mantel is made out of one piece, no more seam in the middle. The whole thing is executed in captured rough italian wool. I can’t see any sleeve eagle traces but as of now it is getting dark and it was on a dark parking lot that I acquired this piece. So I’ll check tomorrow. Something else of interest is that not 4 but 2 slits for the belt hooks on the left and right side are installed. This further signifies for me that this overcoat was made specifcly for the Waffen-SS M44 tunic.

Posted on

M40 Greatcoat – Waffen-SS – Wool – 525

Type of uniform: M40 greatcoat or Tuchmantel 40
Material: Wool
Colour: Field gray or Feldgrau
Branch: Heer
Insignia: The factory sewn sleeve eagle has been removed.
Markings: 525
Maker: 525
Notes: A stunning original M40 Waffen-SS Mantel or overcoat in mint condition. The mantel is not to be confused with the Heer/Army type; this cut of Mantel is different in shape, cut, marking and is specifically made for the Waffen-SS. The eagle has been restored to the sleeve, other then that its a nice untouched mint condition Waffen-SS M40 Mantel. The mantel is marked 525 which is a specific waffen-ss producer. These overcoats are very scarce!

Posted on

A-frame – tropical – Lohmann Werke A.G. 1941

The A-frame or Gefechtsgepäck für Infanterie Schützenkompanien was a small canvas frame which was carried on the Y-strap. It was introduced in 1939. The A-frame was a way for soldiers to pack away their secondary necessities and to divide the weight more evenly on the equipment.

The A-frame carries the following items:

Messkit or M31 Kochgeschirr
Quarter shelter or M31 Zeltbahn
A-frame bag or Beutel zum Gefechtsgepäck

The A-frame bag or Beutel zum Gefechtsgepäck was used to carry a sweater, rifle cleaning kit and the Eiserne Portion.

The A-frame was made in a few varieties showing various ways of manufacture. Later in the war the bags where also made from recycled equipment.

Model: Tropical, full webbing construction
Markings: Lohmann Werke A.G. Bielefeld, 1941
Year: 1941
Maker: Lohmann Werke A.G. Bielefeld.
Material: Webbing

Posted on

A-frame – Brown leather straps –

The A-frame or Gefechtsgepäck für Infanterie Schützenkompanien was a small canvas frame which was carried on the Y-strap. It was introduced in 1939. The A-frame was a way for soldiers to pack away their secondary necessities and to divide the weight more evenly on the equipment.

The A-frame carries the following items:

Messkit or M31 Kochgeschirr
Quarter shelter or M31 Zeltbahn
A-frame bag or Beutel zum Gefechtsgepäck

The A-frame bag or Beutel zum Gefechtsgepäck was used to carry a sweater, rifle cleaning kit and the Eiserne Portion.

The A-frame was made in a few varieties showing various ways of manufacture. Later in the war the bags where also made from recycled equipment.

Model: Standard A-frame with leather straps
Markings: unreadable
Year:
Maker: 
Material: Webbing and leather

 

Posted on

Tan straight E-tool cover – jwa 4

The straight handled shovel or Kleines Schanzzeug was the primary entrenching tool within the German army. It was first introduced in the German army before the first world war after a Danish design by Mads Linnemann. The Germans used several types of straight handled shovels during the war. The most commonly seen type of straight handled shovel used by the Germans has a spot welded blade that has been folded at the top. Next to the use as a tool for digging, it could be used to hack wood and to some extent as a close combat weapon.

The cover was initially fully made out of leather. It consists of 2 carrying loops and a strap to tie down the handle. In the design of the strap a certain amount of extra length was accounted for so a bayonet could be tied to the handle of the E-tool. In 1943 the main material was changed from leather to Ersatzmaterial(artificial leather) or Presstoff completely. The covers came in a few variations in material, colour, construction, buckle and leather colour.

Markings: jwa 4
Maker: Moritz Stecher, Lederwerk, Freiburg
Material: Tan Ersatzmaterial or Presstoff, pressed paper.
Location of loops: Sewn through
Buckle: Painted, with roller.
Notes: 

Posted on

Esbit Modell 101 – Stuttgart-Untertürkheim

The name ESBIT is short for Erich Schumms Brennstoff iTablettenform which translates to Erich Schumms fuel tablets. The main component in these tablets was hexamine, a fuel invented by which was discovered by Aleksandr Butlerov in 1859.
These tablets in the accompanying stoves where a popular way of heating food in the German army during world war two. The Esbit firm was founded in 1933 and three years later the first tablets where sold. In stead of many other ways of heating rations the fuel tablets have a few advantages, they burn on a high temperature, smokeless and don’t liquify whilst burning.

The Esbit model 101 fuel tablet stove is made out of aluminum and consists of five main parts.

The Esbit fuel is packed in a cardboard box which fits neatly inside the stove when not in use. In the box are two large tablets with multiple notches to break up in portions. The fuel is very efficient and burns smokeless with a high temperature.

The Esbit stoves are made at two different factories. The early during world war two manufacture was done in Stuttgart West (marked Stuttg. W.) until 1943. Somewhere in 1943 the Esbit factory continued production in Murrhardt Württ (marked Murrhardt / Württ).

Esbit continued their production postwar and is still in production today. The postwar variant is embossed D.R.P. & ausl. Patente. on the bottom part and lacks KOCHER Mod. 9 – HIER KLAPPEN. The main difference with these postwar stoves is the “teeth” that overlap in the two closing parts and the holes to allow airflow in the bottom part. Even though these are marked D.R.P. these are made postwar. The use of the D.R.P. continued after the war until somewhere in the 1970’s. Sometimes these postwar stoves are even marked with BUND for Bundeswehr or simply a NSN or Nato stock number.

This is the first model collapsible ESBIT stove; ESBIT Kochgestell 101. This was developed in the 1930’s allthough a precise date or patent number I have not encountered. I have pictured the ESBIT stove in such a sequent serie that shows the assembly of the stove.

It is embossed on the front with the following text:
ESBIT KOCHGESTELL
Ges. gesch.
Hersteller: ERICH SCHUMM
Esbit-Fabrik
Stuttgart-Untertürkheim

On the back it is embossed:
Gebrauchsanweisung
Träger u. Trägerplatte zusammenstecken.
Aufgebogene Seite der Trägerplatte rechts u. links in tablettenauflage

Posted on

K98 bayonet frog – gfg 1942

Ever since the introduction of the K98 bolt action rifle or Karabiner 98 Kurz as a replacement for the G98 or Gewehr 98 a new, shorter bayonet was designed. The K98 bayonet was officially named Seitengewehr 84/98 or SG 84/98.  The bayonet was designed as a close combat sidearm that could be placed on the tip of a K98.

The total length of the K98 bayonet was 38,7 cm in contrary to the 50.2 cm long G98 bayonet. The blade was also more straight and the hand guard was omitted. The K98 bayonet was carried in a leather frog or Seitengewehrtragetasche.  It was carried in the frog on the left side on the equipment belt in combination with the shovel and its carrier. The maker marks on k98 bayonets where stamped onto the top of the blade. On the reverse the batch number and suffix where stamped.

Model frog: Without securing loop
Markings: gfg 1942
Maker: Karl Hepting u. Co., Leder- u. Guertelfabrik, Stuttgart
Year: 1942
Material: Tanned leather
Notes:
 –

Posted on

K98 pouches – 0/0365/0012

The ammunition pouch for the K98 (Karabiner 98) bolt action rifle was executed in leather. Each soldier had two pouches which held 30 rounds each. The pouches where divided in 3 main compartments with a divider in each. The 7,92 x 57 mm ammunition was loaded on 5 round clips. Pre/early war the pouches where executed in brown leather, to be blackened and polished by the individual soldier. Some time early in the war (most) producers switched to blackening the leather pre production. Further simplifications occurred in 1943 when the pouches where further simplified. Some of these changes are the shortened loops for the belt and the use of rivets in stead of stitching or even combined. The back of the pouches have a D-ring to which the front hooks of the Y-strap would be attached.

Colour: Black
Marking: 0/0365/0012
Maker:
It is unknown what maker 0/0365/0012 refers to but the company was located in Erfurt.
Year: 1943 – 1945
Stitched or riveted: Stitched

Posted on

Helmet – M40 – SE66 – Single decal Luftwaffe

Arguably the helmet was the most recognizable part of the individual German soldiers appearance. With a design that derived from the type used in world war one, the German helmet offered more protection then ones used by it’s enemies. The quality field gray painted steel helmet with two decals and rolled steel rim and leather liner was a labor intensive product and simplified as the war progressed. The earliest model helmet used in world war two was the model 35 or M35 Stahlhelm. During the war the helmet was simplified in 2 stages. In 1940 the airvents changed from separate rivets affixed to the helmet shell to stamped in the main body of the shell. In 1942 a new model was introduced where the rim of the shell was left sharp and not rolled over as previous models. These models are known in the collector community as M40 and M42. The low sides that protect the neck and ears, the tell tale design that the Germans introduced in 1935 can still be seen in modern day army helmets.

Model: M40 Luftwaffe (Airforce)
Decal: Single decal Luftwaffe
Paint: Factory applied dull blue paint with aluminum oxide and a Luftwaffe decal.
Markings:
 SE66 4961
Maker: Sächsische Emaillier und Stanzwerke A.G.
Size: Shellsize 66, headsize 59 cm
Batch number: 4961
Year: 1940
Chinstrap: none
Notes:

 

 

Posted on

MP44 / STG44 pouch – ROS 1944

Markings: The markings are unreadable
Maker: This model pouch is attributed to the maker E. G. Leuner, Bautzen and are often found to be marked ros 1944 and marked on the side flaps.
Colour of main material: Late war canvas with the typical red line which was woven in to indicate the length of fabric during fabric production.
Closing straps: Woven canvas with leather retaining straps
Belt loops: Canvas
D-ring strap: Canvas
Notes: –

 

Posted on

Steel belt buckle – Heer – Tropical Hermann Aurich 1942

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Branch: Wehrmacht (Heer)
Motto: Gott Mit Uns
Markings: 42 HA
Maker: Hermann Aurich
Year: 1942
Material: Painted steel with a webbing tab.
Paint: Green paint
Notes: 

Posted on

Y-strap – Franz Brehme, Walsrode 1940

Y-straps with auxiliary straps or “Koppeltragegestell aus Leder mit Hilfstrageriemen” was first introduced in April 1939. Meant to distribute the weight of the equipment evenly, the Y-straps where a important part of the equipment. In April 1940 the official name was changed to “Koppeltragegestell für Infanterie” Even though it was introduced in 1939 it only saw widespread use from 1941 onwards. Also in that year the first “tropical” Y-straps where introduced, they stayed in production until the end of the war. As the war further progressed the Y-straps underwent many minor changes ever simplifying the production.

Markings:
Franz Brehme, Walsrode 1940
Maker:  Franz Brehme, Walsrode.
Year: 1940
Hardware: Aluminium
Notes:

Posted on

M42 canteen – L&SL 44

Marking: L&SL 44 on the cup
Maker: Linnepe & Schiffer Metallwarenfabrik, Lüdenscheid
Year: 1944
Strap: Smooth blackened leather.
Material: Painted steel
Cover: Felt with four painted press studs
Other notes:  A very nice late war L&SL 44 marked M42 canteen indicating production by Linnepe & Schiffer Metallwarenfabrik, Lüdenscheid. A textbook late war canteen with 3 presstuds on the cover, riveted loops and a nice brown strap.  Rare to find combination!

Posted on

M42 messkit – MN43

The M31 messkit or “Kochgeschirre M 31 (Alum.)” was a 1.6 liter capacity cooking pot carried on the left side of the breadbag. The messkit was a clever engineered piece of equipment capable of serving as a cooking or eating pot. The early models also had indicating marks on the front, under the handle on which could measure the size of the contents. It had a cleverly placed wire handle on which the messkit could be hung above a fire. The messkits came in a big variety of colours and materials. At first the messkits where nearly completely made out of aluminium except the wire handle. From around 1940 onwards the handle on the lid was made from steel. In 1942 the simplified steel model “Kochgeschirre M 42 (Eis.)” was introduced. It had less and less well crafted details and the production became a hurry. I found the designation “M42” in the production numbers of the German Industry.

Model: M42
Marking: MN 43
Maker: Metallindustrie GmbH. Neunkirchen-Saar (MENESA)
Material: Steel
Colour: Dark green
Notes: –

Posted on

Brown equipment belt – Stecher Freiberg 6 39

The standard Equipment belt or Koppelriemen kept all the equipment together and is to be considered one of the key elements. Finding a nice one can be hard nowadays and reproductions are plenty. Right up to 1943 the early model was produced with a leather tongue with a series of holes on the inside which kept the prongs of the belt buckle. The later models where simplified whereas this leather tongue was omitted and the holes simply cut through the belt. The hook for the belt buckle was first produced in aluminium later to be replaced by steel. The belts are adjustable and marked in size ranging between 75 and 120 centimeters. These belts also came in a tropical variant made from webbing material. These are always made in the configuration with the leather tongue.

Colour: Brown
Leather: Undyed leather
Markings: Stecher Freiberg 6 39
Maker: Stecher Freiberg
Year: 1939
Hardware: Painted aluminium
Size: 105 centimeters
Notes:

 

Posted on

Steel belt buckle – Heer – Reichswehr – Schmole & Comp. 1923

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Branch: Reichswehr (Heer)
Motto: Gott Mit Uns
Markings: Schmole & Comp. 1923
Maker: Schmole & Comp. 
Year: 1923
Material: Alpaca
Paint: None
Notes:

 

Posted on

Steel belt buckle – Heer – Reichswehr – B.H. Haarmann 1934

From even before world war one the Germans and many other european armies had distinctive belt buckles that locked the belt in place and at the other hand distinguished the individual wearers service branch. The German military belt buckles or Koppelschloss from world war two can be sorted in a few categories being Heer (Army), Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS. Next to these categories one could sort the difference between different colours, designs, makers, dates, materials, uses and absence or presence of leather tab. The first military buckles introduced in the Reichswehr Era where of a stamped Alpacca construction with a brass catch. This type of material and manufacture was also used in the first models of Waffen-SS belt buckles. The first Heer, Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe belt buckles with swastika where introduced in 1936 and manufactured in moulded Aluminium.
In 1940 the aluminium belt buckles ceased production and the painted steel belt buckles where introduced for all service branches. Until 1942 they featured a leather tab on which the manufacturers name, town and date of manufacture. The Waffen-SS belt buckles never had such tabs! In 1943 the Heer Einheitkoppelschloss in a dark blue colour known as Graublau was introduced. I can not find any reference to it as of now, but in my opinion this might well be a buckle meant for all branches of the Wehrmacht and not just the Heer and Kriegsmarine.

Branch: Reichswehr (Heer)
Motto: Gott Mit Uns
Markings: B.H. Haarmann Lüdenscheid 1934 – 11./J.R. 90
Maker: B.H. Haarmann Lüdenscheid
Year: 1934
Material: Alpaca
Paint: None
Notes: 11./J.R. 90 indicates that this buckle was issued to a soldier in the 11th company of Infanterie Regiment 90

Posted on

Brown P38 holster – Hardshell – lyo

During the war the Germans produced, captured and reissued many different pistols to their troops. Most if not all pistols had specific holsters and some pistols even had multiple kinds of holsters. Captured pistols where sometimes even fitted with new, German made holsters during the war. The standard pistol in the German army was the P.08 which in 1938 was replaced by the P.38. The P.08 was replaced but remained in production until 1945 by Krieghoff.

The Walther Pistole 38 (P.38) pistol was first introduced in 1938 as a replacement for the P.08. The P.38 was a more cost-efficient and more reliable in  war conditions such as mud and rain. The P.08 was a typical prewar German gun, over engineered to perfection with a sensitive toggle breech system that would malfunction when dirt was involved. The P.38 was a workhorse that did just what it was meant to do. It could handle most harsh battlefield conditions and as such the closed hardshell holster was discontinued later in the war and replaced for a open softshell holster. During the war 990.080 P.38 pistols where produced by Walther, Mauser and Spreewerk.

Pistol: Walther Pistole 38 (P.38)
Model holster: Hardshell
Markingslyo P38
Year: 1944/1945
Maker: lyo indicating production by Kromolowski & Sohne Lederwaren fabrik, Radom, Limanowskistr,69
Material: Dyed leather
Notes: –

 

Posted on

P38 holster – Hardshell – gcx 1942

During the war the Germans produced, captured and reissued many different pistols to their troops. Most if not all pistols had specific holsters and some pistols even had multiple kinds of holsters. Captured pistols where sometimes even fitted with new, German made holsters during the war. The standard pistol in the German army was the P.08 which in 1938 was replaced by the P.38. The P.08 was replaced but remained in production until 1945 by Krieghoff.

The Walther Pistole 38 (P.38) pistol was first introduced in 1938 as a replacement for the P.08. The P.38 was a more cost-efficient and more reliable in  war conditions such as mud and rain. The P.08 was a typical prewar German gun, over engineered to perfection with a sensitive toggle breech system that would malfunction when dirt was involved. The P.38 was a workhorse that did just what it was meant to do. It could handle most harsh battlefield conditions and as such the closed hardshell holster was discontinued later in the war and replaced for a open softshell holster. During the war 990.080 P.38 pistols where produced by Walther, Mauser and Spreewerk.

Pistol: Walther Pistole 38 (P.38)
Model holster: Hardshell
Markings: gcx 1942 P38
Year: 1942
Maker: gcx indicating production by Ing. Karl Brettschneider, Maehrisch-Schoenberg.
Material: Dyed leather
Notes: –

Posted on

P38 holster – Softshell – ros 1944

During the war the Germans produced, captured and reissued many different pistols to their troops. Most if not all pistols had specific holsters and some pistols even had multiple kinds of holsters. Captured pistols where sometimes even fitted with new, German made holsters during the war. The standard pistol in the German army was the P.08 which in 1938 was replaced by the P.38. The P.08 was replaced but remained in production until 1945 by Krieghoff.

The Walther Pistole 38 (P.38) pistol was first introduced in 1938 as a replacement for the P.08. The P.38 was a more cost-efficient and more reliable in  war conditions such as mud and rain. The P.08 was a typical prewar German gun, over engineered to perfection with a sensitive toggle breech system that would malfunction when dirt was involved. The P.38 was a workhorse that did just what it was meant to do. It could handle most harsh battlefield conditions and as such the closed hardshell holster was discontinued later in the war and replaced for a open softshell holster. During the war 990.080 P.38 pistols where produced by Walther, Mauser and Spreewerk.

Pistol: Walther Pistole 38 (P.38)
Model holster: Softshell
Markings: ros 1944 P38
Year: 1944
Maker: ros indicates production by E. G. Leuner, Bautzen.
Material: Dyed leather
Notes: – This is the so called softshell variant, the more cost efficient latewar holster for the P38 pistol.

Posted on

P08 holster – Hardshell – Karl Bücker, Waldbröl 1939

During the war the Germans produced, captured and reissued many different pistols to their troops. Most if not all pistols had specific holsters and some pistols even had multiple kinds of holsters. Captured pistols where sometimes even fitted with new, German made holsters during the war. The standard pistol in the German army was the P.08 which in 1938 was replaced by the P.38. The P.08 was replaced but remained in production until 1945 by Krieghoff.

The Walther Pistole 38 (P.38) pistol was first introduced in 1938 as a replacement for the P.08. The P.38 was a more cost-efficient and more reliable in  war conditions such as mud and rain. The P.08 was a typical prewar German gun, over engineered to perfection with a sensitive toggle breech system that would malfunction when dirt was involved. The P.38 was a workhorse that did just what it was meant to do. It could handle most harsh battlefield conditions and as such the closed hardshell holster was discontinued later in the war and replaced for a open softshell holster. During the war 990.080 P.38 pistols where produced by Walther, Mauser and Spreewerk.

Pistol: Luger Pistole 08 (P.08)
Model holster: Hardshell
MarkingsKarl Bücker, Waldbröl 1939 P08
Maker: Karl Bücker, Waldbröl
Year: 1939
Material: Dyed leather
Notes: –

Posted on

Camouflaged gasmask canister – Battle damaged two tone camouflage

Throughout world war two the German army issued and carried gas masks. After the terrible experiences in world war one these where thought of as one of the most important pieces of equipment issued. The Germans utilized every gasmask with a metal canister so to keep the gasmask in good usable condition. The metal cases where first introduced in world war one and further evolved through the Reichswehr and ultimately in 1935 by the Wehrmacht. Several small changes where made to the canisters appearance ranging from the length of the canister to sealing the lid of the canister to make it dust tight.

Notes: This gasmask canister has a large battle damage to the side which also damaged the gasmask. The piece was most probably hit by shrapnel. On the bottom the canister is named to M. Schumacher.

The inside of the lid a Feldpostnummer is stamped which corresponds to the following units:

L49451 

(2.1.1940-11.3.1943) leichte Flak-Batterie z.b.V. Division Hermann Goring, 

(12.3.1943-7.9.1943) z.b.V. BatterieFlak-Regiment Hermann Goring, dann 19. Batterie Flak-Regiment Hermann Goring, dann 9. Batterie Flak-Regiment Hermann Goring, 

(23.4.1944-24.11.1944) 4.8.1944 9. Batterie Fallschirm-Flak-Regiment Hermann Goring, 

(25.11.1944-8.5.1945) 19.12.1944 10. Batterie Fallschirm-Flak-Regiment Hermann Goring.

Matthias Schumacher was born on 14-8-1921 and was reported missing in action on  1-1-1945. He is still reported as missing in action.

 

Posted on

Camouflaged gasmask canister – Three tone “Normandy” camouflage

Throughout world war two the German army issued and carried gas masks. After the terrible experiences in world war one these where thought of as one of the most important pieces of equipment issued. The Germans utilized every gasmask with a metal canister so to keep the gasmask in good usable condition. The metal cases where first introduced in world war one and further evolved through the Reichswehr and ultimately in 1935 by the Wehrmacht. Several small changes where made to the canisters appearance ranging from the length of the canister to sealing the lid of the canister to make it dust tight.

Notes:

The gasmask is nicely painted in the typical three-tone Normandy camouflage. The container still retains up to 85% of its original camouflage paint and retains its original straps, mask and accessories. Inside the gasmask is named to Obergefreiter Heinz Metzler with the Feldpost number 34061 which corresponds to the following units belonging to the 348. Infanterie-Division which was destroyed in the Normandy battles!

(2.1.1940-27.4.1940) 3. Kompanie Fla-Bataillon 603,
(1.3.1942-7.9.1942) gestrichen,
(8.9.1942-11.3.1943) Regimentsstab, 13.-14. 
Panzerjager-Kompanie,15. Radfahr-Schwadron 
und 16.schwere Granatwerfer-Kompanie Festungs-Infanterie-Regiment 
863,
dann Regimentsstab, 13.-14. Panzerjager-Kompanie 
und 15. schwere Granatwerfer-Kompanie Festungs-Infanterie-Regiment 
863,
dann Regimentsstab u. 13.-15. Kompanie 
Festungs-Infanterie-Regiment 863,
(23.4.1944-24.11.1944) 4.5.1944 Regimentsstab m. Einheit 
Festungs-Grenadier-Regiment 863,
(25.11.1944-Kriegsende) 11.12.1944 gestrichen.

The lid compartment still retains the spare lenses and the contamination test swabs. Underneath the gasmask is the cleaning cloth and spring but also a small envelope with Metzler name on it containing a piece of raw cotton, probably to polish the lenses. A real Normandy veteran.